Top Questions About Greengage Plum Tree

Click on links below to jump to that question.

Questions About Greengage Plum Tree

Asked by
Anonymous on
June 5, 2011

Q. Greengages

I planted a greengage last year, and this year it had lots of blossoms. I flicked off the fruits that weren’t strongly attached and all looked good. Then the new shoots and also some of the older leaves curled up, and although I sprayed it with a mixture of tobacco and detergent, it eventually looked so sad that the other evening I cut off all the affected shoots and leaves. Have I done right or wrong?

Answered by
Nikki on
June 6, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

As long as the roots and stems are still ok, it will regrow. You may want to try treating the plant with neem oil should any more problems arise.

00
Was this answer useful?
Join Us - Sign up to get all the latest gardening tips!
Asked by
king3107 on
June 11, 2013

Q. Plum (Greengage) Tree Dying?

My plum tree has not been pruned for 2 years now, and produced no fruit last year (probably due to a badly timed frost at blossom time), although it kept its leaves. This year there was an abundance of blossoms, but suddenly about two weeks ago the tree seemed to start dying from the trunk outwards. All the blossoms turned brown and dried out/fell off, along with the leaves. Now all I have are a few yellowing leaves at the end of the branches. What have I done? What can I do, and will it die? It’s such a shame as I think the variety is ‘Early Transparent Gage’ and the fruit is delicious.

Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
June 12, 2013
00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
brownfingers on
July 1, 2014

Q. Greengage problem

I have a greengage growing espalier fashion. Copious fruits were produced this year (the first year it has properly fruited). But after a few weeks most of the fruits have turned a reddish colour, stopped growing and are slightly shriveled. They are very easily knocked off the branches. How can I prevent this happening next year?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
July 2, 2014
A.

This article outlines some common plum diseases: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/plum/plum-tree-diseases.htm
If it is a rot disease, you need to get it identified so you can treat it. Please get in touch with the nearest botanical garden and the Master Gardener program; they can help you.
Greengages plums are a very special fruit. In doing some research, I found this very interesting article: http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/01/dining/01GREE.html?pagewanted=print&position=&_r=0

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
lizdunnett on
May 2, 2016

Q. Greengage tree

I have a small greengage tree which must be about 10 years old. In that time I have only had one small sweet fruit from it! At the moment it is covered in blossom, as it is most years, but it’s downhill from there. Is there anything I can do to make the fruit set? Or is it too cold where I live to expect a crop? Thanks!
Liz,
Perth, Scotland

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
May 4, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

You should be in the right growing zone for a Greengage Plum Tree.

Your trees needs a full sun location with a good loamy soil that is well draining.
Ph should be in the 6.0 to 7.0 range.
Though this is a self fertile tree you may want to add an additional pollinator to your garden.
Fertilize your tree with a balanced fertilizer. This should be applied annually and a good rule of thumb is 8 oz of 10-10-10 for every year of tree age.
Supplement with nitro-chalk sulphate of potash in February each year.
Every third year add superphosphate.
Mulch the tree with a good compost, but do not place it directly next to the trunk.

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
kevnzoe1102 on
August 3, 2017

Q. Picking green gage plums

Will green gage plums ripen abit more once picked, can i pick them when they are still a bit hard or do i have to wait until they are soft, will they soften once I’ve picked them. Many thanks.

Answered by
Liz Baessler on
August 10, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Green gage plums will soften somewhat after you've picked them, but they won't reach their peak flavor unless they're allowed to ripen on the tree. This article goes into depth about it:
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/01/dining/a-finicky-fruit-is-sweet-when-coddled.html

00
Was this answer useful?
Learn

Learn From
Your Peers on
Our Blog

Visit Our Blog
The website that started it all!
Main Website

Do you know a lot about gardening?
Become a GKH Gardening Expert

Learn More