Top Questions About Grape Hyacinth

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Questions About Grape Hyacinth

Asked by
Anonymous on
March 19, 2011

Q. Grape Hyacinth Bulb Planting

I forgot to plant my grape hyacinth bulbs last fall. Can I plant them now so I don’t lose them? I realize they probably won’t bloom. Can I plant clusters of ten or so now?

Answered by
Nikki on
March 20, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, you can still plant them and there is a good chance they will still bloom this year.

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Asked by
scottie on
March 21, 2011

Q. Grape Hyacinths

Last year I cleared a bed of everything, including grape hyacinth bulbs, and added new soil and re-planted it with pink flowers/plants. This year the grape hyacinths are back in profusion more than ever and the pink plants are being smothered. Please can you help?

Answered by
Heather on
March 23, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

It is very hard to get rid of grape hyacinth. Likely, last year, they spread seeds and very small bulblets which you would not have been able to see. They need to be handpulled to be removed. You will likely also need to do this next year as well. Make sure that they and any other grape hyacinth nearby do not go to seed. Remove the spent blossoms before they produce seed pods and this will help keep the spread of them down.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
April 17, 2011

Q. Planting Grape Hyacinths and Daffodils in Spring

I was given some lovely (potted) flowering plants to use as centerpieces for Easter dinner a couple of weeks ago (a grape hyacinth, white tulips, and some daffodils). They were beautiful and I loved having living plants on the tables instead of cut stems. My question is, now that the blooms have faded off the plants, can I plant them outside? All the advice I’ve read on planting them says to do it in the fall. I’m in Massachusetts (Zone 5), and it’s mid-April. Further complicating matters is that my property is at the edge of woods, and most of the sun we get is afternoon. I’m not sure if all of these factors add up to an overly inhospitable situation. Would love some advice!

Answered by
Nikki on
April 18, 2011
Certified Expert
Asked by
Anonymous on
April 30, 2011

Q. Grape Hyacinth Bulbs

I have just received a bag of grape hyacinths that was pulled from a friend’s garden. Can I plant them now? If not, can I store the bulbs for planting in the fall? If storing the bulbs, how and where (what conditions) do I do this?

Asked by
Anonymous on
April 30, 2011

Q. Grape Hyacinths

I need to move clusters of grape hyacinths. Some are too crowded to bloom and I am redoing garden area. I want to know if it is okay to cut most of the top off and move them just after the bloom time. The long leaf area on the bulbs just makes it difficult to plant.

Answered by
Nikki on
May 2, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

While it is not necessary to remove the tops, it won't hurt the plants, so go ahead.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
May 4, 2011

Q. Planting Grape Hyacinth

I just received 24 grape hyacinth bulbs. Can I plant them now? If not, how do I store them until fall?

Answered by
Nikki on
May 5, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, you can plant these bulbs now without worry about storing them until fall. They require a little time to establish themselves in ground and should begin popping up next spring. These articles should help:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/bulbs/grape-hyacinth/planting-and-care-of-grape-hyacinths.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/bulbs/bgen/is-it-too-late-to-plant-bulbs-when-to-plant-bulbs.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
May 6, 2011

Q. Grape Hyacinth ‘Seeds’

After grape hyacinth blooms and flowers are gone there are little ‘seed’ like balls on the stem. Can these be planted for next year? Are they actually reproductive seeds or just left over from where the bloom was and can be cut back because they are useless?

Answered by
Nikki on
May 7, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, these are seeds and in a naturalized setting, they will re-seed and produce addition plants. In fact, in some areas, they may even be considered somewhat invasive, popping up in many unexpected locations.--They're everywhere in my own yard. When collecting seeds, you'll need to wait for them to dry and wither. When they are ready, the pods start to turn light brown and papery. Once dry, you can plant them as you would any other seeds and once seedlings are big enough, you can transplant in the garden or container. However, they don't usually bloom the first year so you'll have to wait until the plants mature.

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