Top Questions About Four O’clock Flowers

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Questions About Four O’clock Flowers

Asked by
Anonymous on
April 9, 2011

Q. Four O’clocks and Cucumber Plants

I live on the top of the Cumberland Plateau in Cumberland County, Tennessee. That is located just a little west of the eastern time zone; so we are considered being on central time. I started cukes from seed in a plastic container. I dug up my four-o’clocks today to weed where I wanted the cukes. I transplanted the young cuke stalks into that rich, black soil. Is it alright to replant the four-o’clock bulbs around the wide area where I planted my young cucumbers? Now that the cukes are in the soil (front yard with Tennessee stone laid around the garden), how can I be reassured they will not get too cold, and how can I try keeping them warm for chilly nights like we had last night?

Answered by
Nikki on
April 10, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

As long as you leave enough space for the cukes to grow, it should not be a problem to replant your four o'clocks. Also, adding a layer of straw mulch around your plants should help insulate the ground and hold in heat when needed.

Here is an article that you may find helpful if frost is expected: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/frost-how-to-protect-your-plants.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 21, 2011

Q. 4 O’clocks Not Blooming

My four o’clocks are not blooming. They are big and beautiful but not blooming. Can you tell me why?

Answered by
Becca062 on
July 21, 2011
A.

Four o'clocks are often mid-summer bloomers. since I don't know where you are, it may be that it is not quite time for blooms there. You mention the foliage looks good, if this is the result of lots of nitrogen fertilizer, the plant may be directing energy into foliage instead of flowers. If so, stop fertilizing, keep them watered and blooms may soon appear.

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Asked by
mfaye on
August 2, 2012

Q. Do I need to deadhead Colorado Four O’Clock plants?

Mine stopped flowering and I read online that they will bloom June-Sept. I’m wondering if I should have been deadheading all along.

Answered by
Nikki on
August 2, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, it helps to deadhead these plants, especially if you don't want them popping up everywhere else in the garden, as they are self-seeding in many places.

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Asked by
Paul walsh on
October 10, 2012

Q. Can I Leave the Roots in the Ground for Four O’clocks

Today I began cutting down and then digging up the roots of my four o’clock plants. After looking at the root itself, I wondered if I should should be removing at all.  Can I, or should I, remove the entire root? I will plant the four o’clocks in the same area. Am I wasting my time? Your site suggests root divisions. Not sure exactly what that means.

Answered by
Nikki on
October 10, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

You do not need to dig up these roots if you are concerned with winter damage. They should naturally die back over winter but will regrow once spring returns. In fact, some of the dropped seeds may even sprout new plants in various areas of the garden.

As for root division, you should wait for spring to divide these plants and that's if they are outgrowing their boundaries and becoming crowded. You would simply dig up the clump and use a spade shovel (or whatever) to split the clump into as many sections as you require, each having their own root system. Then replant elsewhere.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
October 18, 2012

Q. Identify This Plant Please

It comes up in spring from a corm, I believe. The plant is a single stem, about 24 inches tall, with about 8 to 12 flowers that raise up in the evening and drop down in the day time. I had about 5 plants some time ago but have accidentally dug them out. Color was light purple to blue.

Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
October 19, 2012
A.

The plant is possibly "Four O'Clocks" or Marabilis Jalapa. This article should help: http://www.gardensablaze.com/Perennials/Perennials4oclock.htm

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Asked by
noralee on
May 18, 2013

Q. ID for the 4 O’clock Flower

I have four o’clocks on my newly purchased property, but I don’t know what they look like when coming up in the spring. Can you send me a photo of them when they first emerge?

Thank you

Answered by
Heather on
May 20, 2013
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Asked by
Opallady on
June 11, 2013

Q. The Four O’clock Plants Are Taking Over a Section of My Garden

Can I pull up and thin out some of the four o’clocks and plant them elsewhere?

Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
June 12, 2013
A.

Absolutely, thin them. I'm not sure how well they will transplant in hot weather, but you could collect some mature seed and let them germinate where you want them.

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