Top Questions About Elm Trees

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Questions About Elm Trees

Asked by
Anonymous on
April 6, 2011

Q. Sooty Mold on Elm

Please tell me how to get rid of it on my tree. It appears to be on the trunk in one visible patch about a foot long and approximately six feet off the ground.

Answered by
Nikki on
April 6, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

It is probably not sooty mold, but rather sooty canker. This article will help:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/tree-disease-identification-sooty-canker-fungus.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
May 12, 2011

Q. Drake Elm Sap

I recently planted Drake Elms in my yard. Now there is sap coming from them. We pruned a few branches from the lower trunk. Could this be why there is sap now? Does it mean there is something wrong with the trees? Are we over watering?

Answered by
Nikki on
May 12, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

The fact that you just pruned makes this quite normal and you shouldn't be worried. However, this article should help in the event that you notice other sap-related symptoms:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/what-is-tree-sap.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 15, 2011

Q. Elm Tree Dead

We have a 14-yea-old N. American Elm tree in our yard. The winters and springs here can be very hard on trees, as we are subject to Chinook winds, which can raise temperatures by 30 degrees in a few hours and occur repeatedly from Nov-April. The tree had evidence of buds in the early spring, which have not developed but are basically brown husks. The ends of the lower branches are mushy and the tree appears dead. It did not exhibit any signs that I could see of Dutch Elm Disease leading up to this. All other trees have full summer foliage. In your opinion, if the tree is not dead, is there any hope of a full recovery in time? Is this typical of the kind of thing that can happen to trees in southern Alberta? (We do have some poplars that have produced early buds, which have never leafed out and the tree limbs in question do not recover. )

Asked by
Anonymous on
July 5, 2011

Q. Chinese Elm Tree

My Chinese elm is dropping its leaves now, in July. What could be the cause?

Answered by
Nikki on
July 6, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

In many areas, this has been a very hot summer. It is quite common for trees to shed some of their leaves due to heat-related stress. I would not worry too much.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 13, 2011

Q. Tree Sap And White Foam

I just planted a Chinese Elm tree about one month ago, and all looked well. Now I am seeing sap and white foam running out of the bottom to middle of the trunk. I don’t see any damage to the bark. Why is this happening, and how do I stop it? I don’t want this tree to die. Will it die? I just washed it down with soapy water and was thinking about spray painting the trunk. Will this help?

Answered by
Susan75023 on
July 15, 2011
A.

Try researching spittle bugs and see if that is what you have.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 22, 2011

Q. Elm Tree

Worms or larvae, about 1 inch long and white, are in the trunk and branches of my elm tree in Sedona, AZ.

Answered by
Susan75023 on
July 23, 2011
A.

Could be webworms. If so, they will build webs in the tree which are hard to break up for spraying. It can be done, however. See this link.
http://www.dailypuppy.com/articles/elm-tree-bag-worms/0212dfa5-e2ae-d475-a225-d1daefb10a3f

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Asked by
jandhw on
June 11, 2012

Q. Japanese elm leafed out fine this spring then suddenly died

My son’s Japanese elm leafed out fine this spring then suddenly died. This tree is in Sammamish, Wa. He says all was good this spring, then leaves dried up and the entire tree is now dead. No signs of insects, fungus, scale, etc. He also stated a neighbor had the same happened to his tree. Do you folks have any insight ? Thanks Jandhw

Answered by
Heather on
June 19, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

Since there was two trees close by, this would indicate a disease. I would suspect a root rot of some kind. Verticillium Wilt or Cotton Root Rot are both possible, but there are several root rots it could be. I would highly recommend that you take a sample of the soil and roots of the tree to your local extension service to have them tested to be sure what it is. Many of these disease can spread rapidly through the soil and kill other plants in your yard if not addressed.

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