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Asked by
RBND117 on
October 23, 2012

Q. Can Dusty Miller Plants Survive the Winter Frost Outdoors?

Can dusty miller plants survive the winter frost outdoors?

Answered by
Nikki on
October 24, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

While they are tolerant of some frost, these are normally grown as annuals as they will not survive over winter. In some warmer areas, however, they have been known to return.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
April 4, 2014

Q. Dusty Millers

Planted dusty millers last year. They did very well. The snow bent them over. Can I trim them and, if so, how much? They are about a foot tall.

Answered by
Nikki on
April 4, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

These plants are normally treated as annuals, but if yours is still hanging around it won't hurt to trim them back (by a third or down to where the new growth begins). Just make sure that you are not expecting any more wintery weather, as this could likely damage new growth. Here is more information on growing dusty miller plants: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/foliage/dusty-miller/growing-dusty-miller.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
April 16, 2014

Q. Dusty Miller

How far down can I trim as dusty miller in April, Zone 6?

Answered by
Nikki on
November 30, -0001
Certified Expert
A.

If the plant is leggy or simply needs rejuvenation from last year's growth, trim it down to new growth (but no more than a third of the plant). Most actual pruning of this plant takes place following its blooming, of which you can cut it back by a third.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
May 23, 2014

Q. Dusty Miller

I have a very big Dusty Miller plant at my mailbox planter bed. It has beautiful yellow flowers and is getting really big. Is there a way I could move it to a different area of the yard without damaging or hurting it? It is just getting too large for the size of the bed, and I want to put some summer annuals there.

Answered by
Nikki on
May 23, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

You can actually dig up the entire clump and divide it into two or more sections, depending on its size, OR just move the large clump somewhere else in the landscape. Be sure to make the new planting hole large enough to accommodate the plant and give it plenty of water while it re-establishes its roots. This article should help with transplanting to avoid shock: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/learn-how-to-avoid-and-repair-transplant-shock-in-plants.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
May 25, 2014

Q. Dusty Miller Plants

My Dusty Millers are very big on each end. They do very well where I have them but they seem to be overgrown and lots of yellow flowers or blooms. Should I trim them back and discard all the blooms? I do transplant sometime and they do very well. Some the smaller ones also have a lot of blooms.

Answered by
Nikki on
November 30, -0001
Certified Expert
A.

If the plant is leggy or simply needs rejuvenation from last year's growth, trim it down to new growth (but no more than a third of the plant). Most actual pruning of this plant takes place following its blooming, of which you can cut it back by a third.

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Asked by
miller sandra on
March 15, 2015
Hot Springs Ar. 71913

Q. rooting dusty miller plants

Can you root a dusty miller in water or just put in dirt or neither? I have dusty miller that is long and leggy, can I cut and root in water or dirt?

Answered by
shelley on
March 15, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, Dusty Miller can be propagated by stem cuttings. Plant the cuttings in a moist perlite and peat mixture, covered with plastic in an area with bright light.

Just curious, but is your dusty miller in the sun or shade? Dusty millers are more long and leggy when they are located in shady locations.

For more information on the care of dusty millers, please visit the following link:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/foliage/dusty-miller/growing-dusty-miller.htm

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