Top Questions About Desert Rose Plants

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Questions About Desert Rose Plants

Asked by
Anonymous on
March 16, 2011

Q. Desert Rose – No Flowers

We received a desert rose plant for Christmas and to this date it has not flowered. Can you give us a reason why? It’s kept in a big enough pot and at the end of our pergola. A friend suggested putting it in full sun, but it has completely flopped over in the pot since doing that.

Answered by
Nikki on
March 16, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

I would try giving it some phosphorus. Without this nutrient, it would not be able to bloom. Here is more information:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/phosphorus-plant-growth.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
April 14, 2011

Q. Desert Rose

Does the desert rose plant grow well in the ground?

Answered by
Nikki on
April 15, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Desert rose prefers growing in warm conditions, so it is only well suited for growing outdoors in warmer tropical and subtropical regions. Otherwise, it is best to grow the plant in containers. Select an area with full sun.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
September 1, 2011

Q. Desert Rose Seed Pod

My desert rose is about 3 yrs. old from when I first purchased it. It had 2 seed pods that have recently burst open. Can I start new plants from the seedlings?

Answered by
Nikki on
September 1, 2011
Certified Expert
Asked by
Anonymous on
September 11, 2011

Q. Transplanting the Seedlings

My husband and I starting desert rose seeds. we put three seeds in each section of an egg carton. They have come up in each section. Our questions is, should we leave them as a group of three seedlings when we transplant them into bigger seedling pots, or should we only put one seedling in a pot? We have more seeds, should we try and save them for a later date?

Answered by
Nikki on
September 11, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

If they have developed their true leaves, you can go ahead and separate and transplant them into their own pots. You can save the seeds. Place them in a cool (but not cold) place and they will last for awhile until you are ready to plant more.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
October 1, 2011

Q. Desert Rose Propagaton From Seed

I learned from your website about planting from seed but don’t know how to harvest the seeds. My 5 year old (gorgeous) plant has created two seed pods. Do I let the pods get dry and harvest (chance to lose some)? Since they will be ‘fresh’ I can have pots ready to plant the seeds directly instead of drying them but my question is: how do I harvest seeds and when?

Answered by
Nikki on
October 2, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, wait for the seed pod to form and then dry out. After that, you can collect the seeds and plant them.

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Asked by
al dodd on
October 3, 2011

Q. Desert Rose Seed Pods

I have a desert rose with two long seed pods. When the seed pod dries and I get the seed out, how long should I wait before planting and are there any special things I should know?
Thanks, Al Dodd

Answered by
Heather on
October 6, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Seed viability is always best the fresher the seeds are, so if you are ready to start growing them and feel you can keep the seedlings happy, you can plant them right away. Otherwise, you can store the seeds until you are ready. They should store well for at least 6 months, and some will even be viable for a year or so if stored well. Here is an article that can help with storing them:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/seeds/storing-seeds.htm

This article will walk you through the steps of growing the seeds:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/desert-rose/desert-rose-propagation.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
November 18, 2011

Q. Desert Rose (Adenium Obesum)

In your information about how to propagate this plant from cuttings, you did not specify the location of the planted cutting. That is, in direct sunlight or away from direct sunlight, etc.

Answered by
Nikki on
November 19, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

I would give them bright, indirect light until they have become well established, at which time you can give them more direct sun.

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