Top Questions About Container Ponytail Palm Trees

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Questions About Container Ponytail Palm Trees

Asked by
Kat on
November 11, 2012

Q. Transplanting a Ponytail Palm

I have a ponytail palm that is glued into a little bowl. How do I know when to replant it, and how do I get it out of the bowl without killing the palm?

Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
November 11, 2012
A.

I ewould soak the entire bowl and plant in water for at least 4-5 hours, That might loosen the glue.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
February 20, 2014

Q. Transplanting a Ponytail Palm

Yesterday I transplanted a ponytail palm pup. I had to cut it off the side of the mother tree and it didn’t have any roots. Can I get roots to grow by putting the plant in water? This works with some plants. I hope it will work for this one. If not, will putting it in a pot with nutrient-rich soil work?

Answered by
Nikki on
February 19, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

I think that your best bet would be to put it into a pot with damp potting soil. Keep the humidity around it high and keep the soil damp but not soaked. This may not work, but would be your best chance.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
February 20, 2014

Q. Money Tree, Stromanthe, Aralia and Ponytail Plants

Are these strong houseplants that need little care and can go outside in low light areas?

Answered by
Nikki on
February 20, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

All of these are fairly low maintenance plants and enjoy spending summers outdoors in your area but must be overwintered indoors. Money tree does well in minimal sunlight and will not tolerate temperatures below 28 degrees F. Stromanthe needs to be placed in shade to filtered sun and cannot tolerate temps falling below 59 degrees F. Aaralia plants survive under low light as they long as they have moist soil. Indoors they do best in medium or full sun but should be planted in shady areas outside. Bring them back inside once temps drop beneath 60 degrees F. The ponytail palm, while easy to care for, generally needs bright light, but because it is such a forgiving plant, it will be ok if you give it bright light about half of the time. If you keep it in low light conditions half the year and provide bright light conditions the other half the year, it will be perfectly happy. This means that as long as you place it outdoors in the summer in a fairly bright area (no direct sunlight), it will tolerate any indoor light conditions you keep it in during the winter.

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Asked by
Lizzytime on
September 4, 2014

Q. how do I know WHEN to repot my ponytail palm’?

My ponytail palm has quite a bit of root showing on the surface of soil. I’m hoping that this means to repot it. Thank you in advance!

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
September 5, 2014
A.

Yes, sounds like this would be a good time to repot. Here are some tips I hope you can use: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/ponytail-palm/ponytail-palm-care.htm

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Asked by
UncleDon on
November 21, 2014

Q. Transplanting a Ponytail Palm

The bulbous root is a little too wide for the opening of my new pot. Can I shave the sides of the root without causing irreparable damage to the plant (any more than I already have)?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
November 21, 2014
A.

Sorry, you can't "shave" the sides. You need a pot large enough to accommodate the ponytail, so it will look attractive and balanced in its pot. The pot should be large enough to leave at least 2" of soil around the outside of the trunk. Also a shallower pot would look better, I think. You should be able to find another plant that would look handsome in that nice pot.

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Asked by
UncleDon on
November 22, 2014

Q. Ponytail Palm

Once I trim 1/4″ on the side, it will slip into the narrower opening and have plenty of space on the side. A new pot is not an option. Will doing that definitely kill the Palm is my question.

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
November 22, 2014
A.

Ponytail palms are pretty tough, so it's not for sure that cutting the side off will kill it. It will definitely increase the chance for disease though. If cutting one small area will allow the plant to slip inside the pot rather than perch on the top, and you don't feel you can use a different pot, and you're prepared for the possibility of losing the plant, then go ahead and cut it. Let us know how its doing a year from now.

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Asked by
An eland on
November 23, 2014

Q. Ponytail Palm pruning

I have a ponytail palm that is forty years old. Two years ago it reached the ceiling. I cut off the top, hoping that it would send out suckers from the base, but it keeps trying to grow from the very top. I am hesitant to cut off the whole trunk for fear of killing it. Is there any way to encourage sucker growth lower down?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
November 23, 2014
A.

Since the ponytail palm is not a palm but is actually related to agaves, if you cut back that long trunk to whatever spot you want, there's a good chance it will start new growth, probably several heads, from near the cut end. You can also attempt to root the cut section. I would hold off on the cutting back until spring, when you can take the headless trunk outside (not to much sun if it's always been indoors) and water well, a little fertilizer, and the plant might well send out new leaves. It's not a sure thing, but a number of people have reported success doing this.

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