Container Hibiscus Plants

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  1. Transplanting Hibiscus From Pot to Ground
  2. Winter Care for in Ground Hibiscus
  3. Hibiscus Leaves Are Turning Yellow and Dropping Off
  4. Frozen Hibiscus Tree
  5. Bugs on Indoor Hibiscus
  6. Indoor Hibiscus Leaf Cleaning
  7. Do I Need to Prune My Thin-Looking, Hibiscus?
Asked by Anonymous on November 5, 2010
Transplanting Hibiscus From Pot to Ground

My mother has 2 hibiscus potted plants and we wanted to transplant them to the ground around my back porch. When should we do this, or should we do this? The winters are between 45 and 30 degrees average and I read they can’t tolerate this kind of cold. So whatever information you can give me will be appreciated.

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

It sounds like these are tropical hibiscus and they cannot tolerate temperatures under 50 degrees F. Therefore, it would not be a good idea to plant them in the ground. You should overwinter them indoors.

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Asked by tiphaniemclark on November 27, 2010
Winter Care for in Ground Hibiscus

I have hibiscus plants in containers that I bring indoors for winter. But I have one in the ground, is it ok to cover it with a garbage bag to protect it from freezing temperature?

ANSWERS
Heather
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

If it is a hardy hibiscus, it will not need any protection. If it is a tropical hibiscus, than if you are in an area where the temperature gets below 20F, it will not survive, regardless of the protection you give it.

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Asked by catherine on December 7, 2010
Hibiscus Leaves Are Turning Yellow and Dropping Off

It is still flowering profusely but nearly all the leaves are gone. Is this normal? I give it plenty of light but the room drops down to around 60 deg. at night. I really would like to save it. Thanks

ANSWERS
Heather
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Hibiscus in the winter indoors will lose their leaves. They are fighting to go into dormancy. You can try to keep it from going dormant by providing more light and keeping it a little warmer (though it will not look as good as it does in the summer while you have it indoors) or you can just let it go into dormancy.

If you want to allow it to go dormant, place it in a cool, dark place (basements and closets work well). It will lose all its leaves and look dead, but it is fine. Water it once a month - no more than that as it does not need much water in dormancy. In the spring, you can bring it back out and resume normal care.

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Asked by Anonymous on December 18, 2010
Frozen Hibiscus Tree

I have a Hisbiscus tree in a patio contatiner that went through a nighttime freeze in Austin, Texas. What do I do now to care for it? The leaves are all wilted and brown. I haveĀ an in-ground plant that comes back after freezes and pruning, but I have never had a potted tree, so I’m not sure how to care for it after the freeze.

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

When the leaves of a hibiscus die, as long as the stems are still alive (which should be the case unless it was a prolonged freeze), the leaves will regrow. Just care for it as normal and it will recover.

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Asked by Anonymous on December 21, 2010
Bugs on Indoor Hibiscus

I live in the Midwest and brought my hibiscus indoors a few months ago. There are all these tiny bugs on it and near the window where it is placed, they look like gnats. Whay are they, and what can I do to keep this plant healthy until spring?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

They are most likely whiteflies. This article will help you with that:
http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/insects/whitefly-control.htm

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Asked by Anonymous on December 26, 2010
Indoor Hibiscus Leaf Cleaning

I live in Dayton, OH and about a month ago brought my hibiscus trees indoors for the winter. One is thriving, still blossoming and the other must be shutting down for the winter. I know not to over water and I know that some leaves yellowing and dropping off is normal. My wife told me this morning that she thinks the tree that’s still blooming is sick and that on the underside of some leaves she found some indications that the plant may have a disease. I don’t see it, but told her I’d wash the leaves down individually to cleanse them. Can you give me information on a solution of dishwashing liquid/? to clean them with? I can’t spray them because they’re in the dining room on carpet and each weighs about 75 lbs. with the pots they’re in. I’d appreciate any tips you could give me. By the way, this is their 2nd winter being brought indoors.

ANSWERS
Heather
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Some leaves yellowing and dropping is normal, even if the plant is still blooming. That being said, they are very susceptible to pests in the winter, so your wife probably did see something on the plant. You can use these recipes here: http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/organic/natural-home-pesticides-organic-garden-pest-control.htm or you can try treating the trees with neem oil. You can learn more about neem oil here: http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/pesticides/neem-oil-uses.htm

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Asked by bdudzic on December 27, 2010
Do I Need to Prune My Thin-Looking, Hibiscus?

I have had a hibiscus plant for 2 years now and it is getting a little thin and not bushy like it once was. It is indoors for the winter and in a large pot with drainage. Do I need to prune it and if so, how?

ANSWERS
Heather
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Pruning is a great way to bring back fullness to a hibiscus that has gotten too leggy.

If you are keeping it indoors, you can prune it now, but it is really better to wait until spring.

Whether you prune now or in the spring, you can cut it back by up to 1/3 per year.

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