Top Questions About Buckeye Trees

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Questions About Buckeye Trees

Asked by
genevas on
March 27, 2015

Q. aesculus parviflora

What serves as the best method of propagation for bottlebrush buckeye? (seed, cuttings, grafting etc).. Why might one serve better than any other?

Answered by
shelley on
March 27, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

Seeds, which are collected in the fall, have a very limited viability and must not be allowed to dry out. You can plant freshly collected seeds in a gallon nursery pot and keep them moist in sand until the seeds germinate in spring. Plants grown from seed will flower in about 3 years. The only caveat going this route is that I read that the possibility exists for seeds to not be viable after going through this process.

Root cuttings, done in late fall, are another option. You take pieces of root several inches in length and place them in sand under cool conditions. By spring you should start seeing shoots.

I have also read where you can take leafy single node cuttings in June/July, treat it with a rooting hormone and place them in moist peat/perlite. It was suggested that this was a more successful option than root cuttings.

So basically, it all depends. It seems to be a mixed bag on what method is better.

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Asked by
gebmartin on
September 18, 2015

Q. Buckeye tree didn’t produce nuts

Our Buckeye tree is about 30 years old and has always produced an abundance of Buckeyes. This year, we got less than 10 Buckeyes. The tree looks healthy, but I’m concerned. Any ideas?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
September 21, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

Buckeye trees can live 80 to 100 years, so your tree is not old in that context.
Environmental issues are the most likely cause of less production by your tree. A plant that is under stress will stop producing fruit.
Drought, heavy rains, temperatures can all be contributing factors.
If you see no signs of insect or disease, I would not worry and likely the tree will return next year with a larger crop.

Here is a link to refresh you on the growing requirements.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/buckeye/buckeye-tree-planting.htm

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Asked by
wstrauch001 on
June 10, 2016

Q. Buckeye Trees

Safe time to trim? Also, trunk has some bark with separation.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
June 12, 2016
Certified Expert
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Asked by
Anonymous on
November 25, 2017

Q. Planting a tree from a seed.

How do you go about planting a buckeye seed so it will become a tree. What is the process? What time of the year and how do I care for it.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
November 25, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Collect the green buckeye fruit soon after they fall from the trees in autumn. Remove the green husk (fruit) to reveal the brown buckeye inside. Fall is the best time to plant, immediately after collecting the seeds. Soak the seeds in water for 24 hours. Plant them 3 inches deep, either directly in the ground or in moistened seed starting soil. Keep evenly moist (but not soggy) for three weeks or until they germinate. Wash hands after handling, since the fruit and seeds are toxic.

During the first winter, protect the seedling by mulching the ground around it.

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Asked by
Lori Cook on
May 27, 2018

Q. Red buckeye tree

I planted a red buckeye from my grandmother’s seed several years ago. It’s been blooming for years and tries to make seeds but every year every one falls off before fully forming. It’s growing in my front, East facing yard. Mostly sunny. I don’t understand why it can’t form full grown buckeyes. Is it not getting pollinated? Is there anything I can do? It’s otherwise apparently healthy.
Sending a pic of it from today. And one from the spring. Blooms have already come and gone.
Thanks
Lori

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
May 28, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

The premature fruit drop could be caused by drought, hot and dry conditions.

Red Buckeye will flower well in rather dense
shade but takes on its best form when grown in full
sun with some afternoon shade on moist, well-drained
soil. It is native along stream banks and will not do well in dry conditions.

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