Roses
Q.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ROSE BALLING AND BOTRYTIS

Zone PERTH WESTERN AUSTRALIA | Anonymous added on November 21, 2019 | Answered

I HAVE MANY ROSES UNAFFECTED IN SAME BED BUT 4 PRINCESS DE MONACO HAVE ALWAYS BEEN AFFECTED, EVEN THOUGH THEY ARE SPREAD AMONGST OTHER ROSES - HUGE BLOOMS BUT THEY NEVER OPEN FULLY. ANY ADVICE WOULD BE APPRECIATED

A.
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GKH_Susan
Certified GKH Gardening Expert
Answered on November 24, 2019

Are your Princess rose stems closer together than your other roses? Lack of air circulation can promote rose balling.

Rose balling is triggered when rain soaks formed buds then a hot sun dries them causing the petals to stick together. A slime may form as well. The buds cannot open and just wither away.

Botrytis blight is a fungus that attacks roses with a similar result. A gray mold forms on the buds preventing them from opening. A fungicide can help remedy botrytis.

This article offers tips on preventing rose balling.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/what-is-rose-balling.htm

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roseman
Answered on November 23, 2019

Here is a link to an article I wrote on this subject for you: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/what-is-rose-balling.htm The Botrytis is caused by a fungus and its appearance can be clearly seen. Treat it with a fungicide named Mancozeb. Be advised that the mancozeb will leave a yellowish powdery residue on the foliage and buds but that is part of how it works.

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roseman
Answered on November 23, 2019

Here is a link to an article I wrote on this topic for you: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/what-is-rose-balling.htm

Botrytis causes the balling due to a fungus. Using a fungicide such as one called Mancozeb which is available at Amazon.com. Be advised that the mancozeb fungicide will leave a powdery looking yellowish residue on the foliage and buds as that is part of how it works.

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