Top Questions About Yellow Delicious Apple Trees

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Questions About Yellow Delicious Apple Trees

Asked by
Anonymous on
May 22, 2011

Q. Apple Tree Planting

The ground that provides full sunlight twenty-five feet from a five-year-old yellow delicious is hard clay. Without taking the dirt miles away to the county extension office, I thought you perhaps could share light on the subject of digging out the area of planting my new GALA, about eighteen inches in good, rich soil before it ever reaches the hard clay. I know your instructions concerning planting and will follow as stated, but will the thing live after the roots reach the unproven soil?

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Asked by
maryc616 on
August 3, 2012

Q. Are apples safe to eat if the tree has a fungus?

I suspect my golden delicious apple tree has apple rust or something similar, but it produced a LOT of apples. The apples “look” fine but I am not sure if they are safe to eat. The leaves are covered in yellow spots and the underside of the leaves have hair-like spores.

Answered by
Heather on
August 13, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, it is safe. The fungus will not affect you.

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Asked by
KNCRUMP on
September 23, 2012

Q. Do you have to have a pair of apple trees in order to get apples???

I was told that you have to have a mate or nearby apple tree in order for them to make. Please let me know. I love a Golden Delicious and need to know if this means I have to buy two.

Answered by
Heather on
September 23, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

With apples, it is not so much male and female (their flowers contain both) but rather some varieties need cross pollination (a second tree to provide different pollen), some varieties do better with cross pollination and some don't need cross pollination.

Golden delicious don't need a cross pollination tree, but they perform much better if a tree for cross pollination is present. They do not need to be both Golden delicious. In fact, some research shows that trees perform even better when the cross is a different variety.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
August 4, 2015

Q. apples from a tree with fungus

I suspect my Golden Delicious apple tree has apple rust or something similar, but it produced a LOT of apples. The apples “look” fine but I am not sure if they are safe to eat. The leaves are covered in yellow spots and the underside of the leaves have hair-like spores. I want to make sure the apples are edible even if the tree has a fungus. My children really want to eat them! 🙂 Additionally, how do I treat the tree so that the fungus does not return next year? Is there anything I can do for it?

Answered by
shelley on
August 4, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

The symptoms you describe are from cedar apple rust. Here is an article with information on cedar apple rust that will help you:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/apples/cedar-apple-rust-control.htm

My research indicates that while cedar apple rust may reduce a crop, the apples are still considered edible.

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Asked by
sokny on
May 20, 2016

Q. Apple and Pear tree disease

I just purchased some fruit trees from the nursery (Asian pear and Yellow Delicious apple) in April. Looks like there is some sort of disease on them…possibly fire blight? Some of the branches/leaves are dying and turning black. Can someone tell me what I should do to save my fruit trees? Thanks!

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
May 23, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

I would check the trees carefully for any other signs or symptoms to help pinpoint the issue.
Did this issue start right after planting?
Is the soil right for your trees?
Watering is very important in newly planted trees. The soil should be moist but never soggy. Make sure the soil is well draining.

Most greenhouse or garden centers will guarantee new trees for 1 year.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/apples/apple-tree-diseases.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/pear/fixing-pear-tree-problems.htm
http://web.extension.illinois.edu/cook/downloads/9210.pdf

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Asked by
KEE on
June 17, 2016

Q. Multi Grafted Apple Tree – disease?

We have a small 3 year old apple tree we purchased from a nursery. Last year it produced maybe 3 apples total, which more than we were expecting. This year we have many more on various branch types. However, some of the leaves are turning colors and/or getting spots and dying. Can you please help me figure out what is wrong and what I can do to help it? I’ve only been gardening a couple of years and I don’t know a lot about these things. I would love to have this tree for years to come. Please help.

The types of grafted branches are: Melrose, Yellow Delicious, Honeycrisp, and Gravenstein. All are semi-dwarf and we live in Oregon if that makes a difference.

Thank you for your time. -Kara

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
June 18, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

This could be necrotic leaf blotch.
The link below discusses this issue.

https://extension.psu.edu/plants/tree-fruit/news/2014/necrotic-leaf-blotch-appearing-on-apples-and-the-home-stretch-for-controlling-diseases-stone-fruit
These links discuss the common issues and disease found with Apple Trees.
Further inspection of the leaves and plants will help you.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/apples/apple-tree-diseases.htm
https://extension.psu.edu/plants/tree-fruit/diseases/apple-diseases

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Asked by
rpfelix on
September 4, 2016

Q. Apples

Some of the Yellow Delicious fruit on our tree turned brown, soft, and when they fall off and hit the ground, “SPLAT”! Messy and nasty – attracting ants, yellow jackets, etc. What is causing this and how can I prevent it? The majority of the apples are wonderful.

Answered by
Alisma on
September 4, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

It could be black fruit rot:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/apples/apple-tree-diseases.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/apples/black-rot-on-apple-trees.htm

Alternatively, it could be blossom end rot, which can cause apples of the delicious varieties to go soft:

https://extension.psu.edu/plants/gardening/fphg/pome/diseases/blossom-end-rot

Also check whether there are any grubs or other insects inside the apples which could have caused them to rot.

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