Top Questions About Winterberry Plants

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Questions About Winterberry Plants

Asked by
mshag on
December 7, 2012

Q. Red Berry Tree in Illinois

I am seeing red trees with berries. The trees are deciduous and approximately 12 feet tall. I am thinking winterberry holly? I want one of these trees. I live in the lower 1/3 of Illinois, zone 5. Any ideas?

Answered by
Nikki on
December 10, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

If you are seeing them in your area, it's highly likely you can find one available at your local garden center or nusery. These plants are hardy in zones 3-9, so you can grow one successfully in your region.

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Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
December 11, 2012
A.

And meke sure you have both a male and female plant. Like most hollies, it is dioecious, with separate male and female plants; the proximity of at least one male plant is required to pollenize the females in order to bear fruit.

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Asked by
mohlemic on
October 25, 2015
6?

Q. planting in early november

I am considering planting Winterberry and Redtwig Dogwood in early November. Is that too late? I live in South Central PA. I think that is hardiness zone 6.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
October 26, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

Generally in zones 6 and warmer fall planting is fine though November is getting later in the planting window.
Much depends on the weather patterns. If the weather stays warm and the bare roots have time to become established, they can do fine.
With a bare root the feeder roots have been killed and the specimen is basically a stick, a cutting that basically sticks in the ground unable to draw up moisture until it begins to grow.
I would recommend waiting until spring if I have a vote!

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/bareroot-planting.htm

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Asked by
bonnine125 on
March 29, 2017
elkins park, pa. 19027

Q. holly winterberry

Should I plant the winterberry far from the house, because I know someone who has to keep having the plumber come out to cut the roots out of their pipes?

Answered by
Alisma on
March 30, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Holly winterberries usually have a mature size of 6-8 feet tall and 3-5 feet wide, though this can vary by the variety. Based on this, they should be planted 4-5 feet away from the house or more, and you won't have any problems.

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Asked by
ripvan on
December 22, 2017
Suffolk, Va 23435

Q. winterberry

How close can you plant “berry heavy” winterberry plants to a house built on a concrete slab? Or is there something I can do to plant these about 4 feet from my house? Thank You.

Answered by
BushDoctor on
December 23, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Although these aren't known for an invasive root system, I would still plant them at least 1 or 2 feet away from the foundation. This article will give you more information on their care: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/holly/winterberry-holly-care.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
January 7, 2018

Q. Potted Winterberry and Helleborus

I got a potted Winterberry plant and a potted Helleborus HGC Jacob at Christmas time. What should I do with these plants until I can get them in the ground this spring? I live in Ohio Southeast of Columbus, zone 6.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
January 8, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

Helleborus and winterberry plants are quite cold-hardy, so one option is to place the pot outdoors (after a few days or gradual hardening off) in a sheltered spot, such as next to the house, during the winter, and then plant it in spring after the ground thaws. Another option is to simply keep them as houseplants for now.

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Asked by
Mindi Stoner on
February 19, 2018
17517

Q. Winterberry

What is the farthest distance the male can be planted from the female?
Thank you.

Answered by
BushDoctor on
February 19, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

Since these are pollinated by bees, the male can be within a quarter of a mile, and still pollinate the female. So, as long as you plant the male within a quarter of a mile away from the female then you should see berries. Here is an article for more information on the care of these: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/holly/winterberry-holly-care.htm

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