Weed Control

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  1. Weed Killer in Vegetable Garden
  2. Weeding With Salt
  3. Pet Friendly Weed Killer
  4. Grass in a Garden
  5. Corn Meal as Pre-Emergent
  6. Killing Out Grass in Vegetable Garden
  7. Weeding
Asked by Anonymous on April 6, 2011
Weed Killer in Vegetable Garden

Is it safe to apply weed killer to soil before planting vegetables? What type is best?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Almost all weed killers have a period of time after which where it is safe eat food grown in them. The time varies. Organic solutions may take longer to kill the weeds but are less costly and have a shorter time for safe consumption. Chemical controls tend to be more effective but will take longer to fade.

In short, really they are all technically safe. Which you use in your garden is a personal choice.

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Asked by Anonymous on April 6, 2011
Weeding With Salt

What kind of salt (table, iodine, rock) can be used to control weeds in the spring?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Any kind can be used, but be careful when using it. A salted area will not grow anything, including the plants you want to grow.

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Asked by LIONDEB on April 7, 2011
Pet Friendly Weed Killer

How long will the corn meal last for the weed killer before I have to add more to the soil? Looking for a pet friendly weed killer.

ANSWERS
Heather
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Corn meal acts as a pre-emergent, meaning it will prevent weeds from germinating but will not kill weeds already growing. I would reapply it monthly.

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Asked by Anonymous on April 12, 2011
Grass in a Garden

Last year I started a flower and vegetable garden on my existing lawn. I tilled the area very thoroughly but still fought the invasion of grass throughout the year. Is there anything I can treat this area with that will kill the grass but not harm the vegetables or flowers? I have tilled the area thoroughly in preparation for planting this weekend. Also, if there is something I can use , should I continue using it after planting to control the spread of grass?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

You may want to consider planting a no-dig garden. This provides the same benefits as a traditional garden but without the hassle of digging or tilling...and is great for knocking out those pesky weeds, especially unwanted grass.

Here is an article or two that you may find helpful: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/starting/how-to-build-a-flower-bed-starting-a-flower-bed-from-scratch.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/urban/raised-beds-for-urban-settings-no-digging-required.htm

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Asked by Anonymous on April 14, 2011
Corn Meal as Pre-Emergent

After applying corn meal as a pre-emergent, how soon can you plant seeds?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

The recommended wait period (before seeding) when using corn gluten meal is usually 4 to 6 weeks - that's the period the gluten is effective. I would imagine that regular corn meal would be about the same.

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Asked by Anonymous on April 17, 2011
Killing Out Grass in Vegetable Garden

I just tilled out a spot for my garden. What should I do to keep the grass from coming back up?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Many people like to use weed barrier cloth in their garden to keep the weeds down. If that is not appealing, mulching around your plants as you plant them will also keep the weeds down.

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Asked by Anonymous on April 20, 2011
Weeding

I have approximately a 20 square foot yard area of stubborn weeds and wondered if removing the topsoil and replacing it would be a better option than using chemicals. I have tried using sodium chlorate and they just grow back. What are your thoughts?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

If they are broad leaf weeds, you can use a broad leaf specific herbicide to help eliminate them. But if they are grass like weeds, you may not have any choice but to either hand weed or consider re-seeding the lawn.

It sounds like though that you may have some underlying issues that are contributing to the loss of the desirable grass. Often when weeds set in like that, there is something about the soil keeping the desired grass from growing healthy and then giving the weeds an opportunity to get a hold.

You may find these articles helpful:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/lawn-care/lgen/what-the-weeds-in-your-lawn-are-telling-you.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/soil-types-and-weeds.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/lawn-care/lgen/tips-for-improving-the-lawn-and-reducing-maintenance.htm

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