Top Questions About Sweetspire Shrubs

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Questions About Sweetspire Shrubs

Asked by
Anonymous on
April 8, 2011

Q. Sweetspire Pruning

In January our gardener cut all of our beautiful, but overgrown, Sweetspire (Itea virginica) shrubs almost to the ground.  Five to ten inches is all that remains. Spring is here and everything else in the yard is starting to come to life, but I’m still not seeing any new growth on these shrubs! Will they be able to recover, or was this too drastic of a pruning? They were absolutely gorgeous and I’m just sick over this.

Answered by
Nikki on
April 8, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

It should not have been too drastic. This is a form of pruning called rejuvenation. I would give it another few weeks. You will see shoots come up from the base.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 18, 2011

Q. Sweetspire

I’ve just planted 7 sweetspires along the border of my property to keep people from using it as a shortcut. How long does it take before the suckering starts? And once it starts, how do I control it so you can see a break between each bush instead of a tangle of all of them together? Right now they are about 2 feet high and 3-4 feet apart.

Answered by
Nikki on
June 20, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

I would give it another few weeks. You will see shoots come up from the base. When pruning, don't go overboard. Just give it a light trimming as needed, gradually shaping them the way you want.

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Asked by
momadavis63 on
April 7, 2013

Q. Do You Prune a Merlot Sweetspire Bush?

Do you prune a Merlot sweetspire bush?

Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
April 8, 2013
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Asked by
failtenee on
March 25, 2015
6

Q. how to plant itea

How to plant itea? Is it a shallow rooter or should it be planted at a deeper level? Thanks.

Answered by
shelley on
March 25, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

It is recommended to dig a hole that is 1.5 times wider than the plant's root ball but 1 inch shallower.

For more information on the care of itea, please visit the following link:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/itea/itea-sweetspire.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 16, 2016

Q. Can I plant Sweetspire in July

After years of searching for the right shrub for a particularly difficult area in my yard, it appears Itea is it! I am not a great gardener and would appreciate any info you could provide. I know July in S.E. Louisiana is not the ideal time to plant anything. I’ve been very ill this past year and my yard has fallen to pieces! Can I plant Itea Sweetspire this time of year (July)? Thank you :)!
Missy

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 17, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Here is a link with growing information.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/itea/itea-sweetspire.htm
You are correct that planting in July can be difficult but not impossible.
Daily water for the first few weeks and then slightly less as time goes on. If temperatures are above 85 degrees you may need to water twice a day.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
October 7, 2016

Q. Itea virginica

Why is this plant sending out shoots away from the main plant? I had this plant in my landscape in Kentucky and Birmingham, AL without this happening. I am now about 30 miles south of Birmingham. Ready to pull these out because they are so untidy. Thanks

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
October 7, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Itea Virginica does spread by sending runners out form the plant. You can remove these runners as soon as you see them.
You can try using a good landscape cloth to deter these new shoots.

Here is a link with more information.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/itea/itea-sweetspire.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
August 13, 2018

Q. plant disease

My virginia sweetspire bushes and spirea bushes have red spots or marks on the leaves. Some spots are round while others are different shapes. We have had an enormous amount of rain this summer. My plants are located in the front of my house that does not get the sun until afternoon. My beds are mulched, however when I noticed the red marks I pulled the mulch from the bottom of the bushes to help the ground dry out. I can’t find much information on red marks on leaves. Will this hurt the plants and what can I do to help them. I really don’t want to get rid of them. Thank you.

Answered by
drtreelove on
August 13, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

It appears to be fungal leaf spot disease. The shady morning growing conditions and wet environment are contributing to the susceptibility. You can't change the sun exposure, and you won't be able to cure the existing leaf spots, but you can prevent further infections this season with a systemic fungicide spray. I like propiconazole (start again in spring for preventive action):

https://www.domyown.com/propiconazole-143-p-16567.html

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