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  • Answered by
    Downtoearthdigs on
    June 14, 2016
    A.

    Growing likely due to a damp and darker location in your window box, this adorable fungus will not harm your plants!

    Here is a link with more information.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/fungus-lichen/birds-nest-fungus.htm

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  • Answered by
    GKH_Susan on
    November 15, 2019
    Certified Expert
    A.

    You can just spoon it out and follow these tips to prevent more:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/hpgen/preventing-mold-in-the-soil-of-a-houseplant.htm

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    November 19, 2019
    Certified Expert
    A.

    It is a slime mold. It is quite beneficial for your lawn, actually. It is just a little unsightly.

    I would leave it alone, as it is probably consuming some lawn infection- doing quite a service for your lawn.

    Here is some information on the subject: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/fungus-lichen/what-is-slime-mold-slime.htm

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  • Answered by
    MichiganDot on
    November 19, 2019
    A.

    It may look disgusting but it is a completely benign fungus. In the USA, we call it "slime mold" or less commonly, "dog vomit fungus". Typically they are a 1 or 2 day phenomenon then disappear completely. Here is an article with more details: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/fungus-lichen/what-is-slime-mold-slime.htm

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    November 24, 2019
    Certified Expert
    A.

    That's actually what is breaking down those things in the soil. It is fairly important to make sure that it is broken down pretty well before planting, or it will leach nutrients from your plants.

    The white mycelium that you see is fungal, but beneficial. Getting rid of that would leave your garden unusable for a short time.

    Let the rest of that decompose, and turn the soil frequently, until most of the wood has broken down into soil.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/composting/manures/fungus-growing-on-manure.htm

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    10
  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    March 2, 2020
    Certified Expert
    A.

    This is a type of cyanobterium. This used to be known as an algae, but has since been reclassified.

    The most effective way to deal with this is to let the area dry out. The moisture will invite the bacteria back. You can also treat with copper sulfate, which will rid the area of the slime.

    Here is an article for more information: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/lawn-care/lgen/controlling-algae-in-grass.htm

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    10
  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    March 10, 2020
    Certified Expert
    A.

    You may try a horticultural extension service in your area, but without clear photos or the issue, it will be very difficult to give a diagnosis.

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    March 9, 2020
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Unfortunately, your photo did not come through. By your description, it sounds like the Stink Horn fungus.

    This is not harmful to your soil, and is quite good at breaking organic materials down into nutrients.

    Should you still want to remove it, this article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/fungus-lichen/removing-stinkhorn-fungi.htm

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    01
  • Answered by
    KC1958 on
    March 9, 2020
    A.

    No unfortunately it isn’t this. It is rather like red thread that grows in grass, but more red and very virulent. The earth in my raised bed is covered in these reddish threads. What I find strange is that it is only in this particular bed even though I have several with the same soil, weather, aspect etc.

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