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Top Questions About Soil Contamination

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Questions About Soil Contamination

  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    September 29, 2023
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Aluminum shavings can have an impact on soil depending on the concentration and duration of exposure. Aluminum is naturally present in soil, but excessive amounts can be harmful to plants and soil organisms. High levels of aluminum can affect the pH of the soil, making it more acidic, which can inhibit plant growth. Additionally, aluminum toxicity can lead to nutrient imbalances and hinder root development.

    I would definitely try and replace the top layer of the soil. This might negate some of the effects in the future. Here are some articles that will help you with building soil.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    October 31, 2023
    Certified Expert
    A.

    This really depends on the kind of mold that is growing. Some of those can be beneficial to soil, whereas some can do some real damage to plants and animals. To be safe, I would re-compost, or discard completely.

    Here are some articles that will offer more information that you will find useful:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers

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  • Answered by
    GKH_Susan on
    February 19, 2024
    Certified Expert
    A.

    It can dry out or desiccate your plants, so it is best not to water with it.

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  • Answered by
    GKH_Susan on
    April 15, 2024
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Salt can be problematic in soil and I don't know how much was used. Salt will make soil inhabitable for plants. If your spray drained to the shrub, try to flush it with water and make sure it drains well to reduce the amount of salt. If it killed the shrub, you may need to plant a new one a short distance from where the concoction contacted the soil. Here is more:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/organic/homemade-pet-friendly-weed-killer.htm
    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/reversing-soil-salinity.htm

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    April 18, 2024
    Certified Expert
    A.

    I see issues with nitrogen and potassium, for sure. What I see, as well, is extraordinary amounts of zinc and copper. There are many causes for this. Spraying copper pesticides, fresh manures that have been used up, bird or other animals feeds in the soil, and overall contamination can contribute to this.

    Unfortunately, your best bet is to find your nearest extension service. They can help you to take core samples, which will let you know how far down you must till in to dilute these metals. This is really the only solution, since it can take around 300 years to break down in the soil. Dilution becomes the only way, besides complete soil replacement.

    Once you retest the soil after turnover, you can see what needs to be added, then. The results should be very different.

    This article will give you some more information about your local extension services:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/what-is-extension-service.htm

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