Top Questions About Shasta Daisy Plants

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Questions About Shasta Daisy Plants

Asked by
Arielle Fuller on
February 13, 2017
95531

Q. Shasta Daisies in Grass

I bought a few packets of shasta daisies on a whim, and was wondering if I could plant them directly into the grass along a fence of mine, or if I would have to remove the grass first? The soil is good in the area and the grass is pretty sparse anyway.

Answered by
Alisma on
February 13, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

If you cut out small holes from the grass, you could probably grow flowers temporarily in grass, but the grass will soon grown back and crowd them out. It's better to remove the grass first to allow your flowers to establish themselves properly and grow stronger.

Here's an alternative method that would allow you to kill grass in-place without ripping it up and plant flowers right on top:
http://www.rodalesorganiclife.com/garden/secret-converting-lawn-garden

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Asked by
Kfaulkner on
March 28, 2017
32837

Q. Shasta daisy problem

I potted 2 Shasta daisies in large pots a few days ago. One pot looks great, but in the other one the plant had wet looking dark, clear patches on the leaves and some new buds are withering. Now the spots are dry and brown. They have the same water, soil and sun exposure. I’m in Orlando, Fl.

Answered by
Alisma on
March 28, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

This might be a fungal disease, such as those described under "Chrysanthemum" in this article:
http://web.extension.illinois.edu/state/newsdetail.cfm?NewsID=15420

Removing and discarding the affected leaves might help stop the spread. If the spread continues after that, removing the affected plant to protect the healthy plant might be the best option.

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Asked by
evelynchamblee on
April 1, 2017
Sulphur, Louisiana 70665

Q. Shasta daisies.

I’ve got Shasta daisies growing in pots. Should they be planted in the ground in order to reproduce? Also, what can I use to stop insects from eating holes in the leaves?

Answered by
Liz Baessler on
April 4, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

They should be just fine in pots. You can read all about shasta daisy container care in this article: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/shasta-daisy/caring-for-shasta-daisy-in-pots.htm

Unfortunately, those holes could be caused by any number of pests. My best guess is slugs. This article covers slug treatment and might help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/insects/kill-garden-slugs.htm

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Asked by
almarbrennan on
June 23, 2017
Zone 3a

Q. Some of my Shasta daisy are blooming & then the white dies stem middle part seems ok do I have a disease or what? This is the seco

nd year for this. We have a pair of kiwi shrubs on which some leaves have a white mold like substance on a few of the leaves. We are wondering what it is and what we should do to deal with it.
Thank you.
Marian

Answered by
almarbrennan on
June 23, 2017
A.

My shasta daisy are blooming and then some of them the white dies center looks healthy what's up ?

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Asked by
Susan Gardner on
July 20, 2017
San Antonio, Texas

Q. Shasta Daisies

I would like to add some shasta daisies to my garden. Can they be planted in South Texas where the temp can reach 100 degrees at times in the summer?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 21, 2017
A.

Shasta Daisy grow in zones 3-8.

Depending on your location you could be zones 7-9.
I would choose a morning sun and afternoon shade location.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/shasta-daisy/planting-shasta-daisies.htm

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Asked by
Rose kentala on
July 28, 2017
Allen park michigan

Q. Shasta daisies

My daisies bloom beautifully one time and not again the rest of the summer. I can see small buds but they never develop. I deadhead when the flowers are spent. What can I be doing wrong?

Answered by
MichiganDot on
July 28, 2017
A.

I'm assuming this is a shasta daisy. If the plant has been in the same spot for several years, it may be time to dig it up, divide it and inject some nourishment into the soil with compost or peat moss. When you dead-head, do you cut back to the forming bud? It is quite deep and if you don't cut down to it, it may not be getting enough sunlight. Have you tried a light fertilizer application when the plant has its initial bloom? It sounds like it has exhausted itself by the first bloom.

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Asked by
betntrev on
August 7, 2017
S62

Q. Shasta daisies

I planted a shaft a daisy in my garden a couple of weeks ago but within a week it had been stripped of flowers and foliage leaving just ragged stems a few inches tall. Have you any idea what could have done this? I planted two more in another part of the garden and they’re fine.

Answered by
MichiganDot on
August 7, 2017
A.

A hungry woodchuck, aka groundhog, or other critter like rabbit could have done this. Woodchucks are getting used to having humans around and are becoming bolder as a consequence. Normally not a pest except at the edges of cities or woodland borders, they are pushing further in. If you have a free-standing shed in your yard, you have perfect groundhog habitat. Since they climb and dig, like raccoons, fences are of little use. Rabbits live in most areas and can stand tall to reach the upper parts of plants. Rabbits are nocturnal but you might spot one in the early dawn. You might throw a cloche or row cover over the daisies for now. Other options are traps and repellents. For those, you need to know which animal you are dealing with.

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