Top Questions About Salvia Plants

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Questions About Salvia Plants

Asked by
Anonymous on
April 16, 2011

Q. Kill Spittlebugs

Will the garlic spray kill ladybugs? The spittlebugs have almost wiped out our salvias. We have lots of ladybugs.

Answered by
roseman on
April 17, 2011
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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 1, 2011

Q. Overgrown Plants

In fall 2008 I put new landscaping in, including a hosta/coral bells border and randomly placed red astilbe, sardonna salvia, moonbean coreopsis, and two varieties of asters. Last summer everything survived and thrived. I fertilized twice as instructed and was very happy. This year everything has tripled in size. The salvia is three feet tall and some have already fallen to the ground like an umbrella. They are blocking everything else. Is this because I deadheaded them twice last year for three blooms? I plan to transplant all the salvia to the ‘back’ in the fall, but do you have any other suggestions?

Answered by
Nikki on
June 2, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Since these plants do get quite tall, depending on the variety anywhere from 18 inches to 5 feet, it would certainly be a wise move to place them in the back of the bed. One word of caution--some types do not transplant well and resent disturbance; however, to reduce transplant shock, try cutting back about a third of its growth.The best time to transplant any plant is on a cloudy day or in late afternoon so they have a chance to get settled in before drying effects of the sun set in. Place salvias in the ground at the same depth or slightly below the level they were originally growing.

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Asked by
weasel on
August 2, 2011

Q. What Type of pH for Salvia?

It is potted and in-ground.

Answered by
Susan75023 on
August 5, 2011
A.

http://www.armstronggrowers.com/pages/expertise/diseases-pests/armstrong-solutions-syngenta-flowers-salvia will give you guidance. I have grown salvia in both alkaline and acidic soil without problems, however. If it is a hardy variety, it can be planted in the soil (no pot).

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Asked by
weasel on
August 29, 2011

Q. Hardiest in Z-9b, Cold-Hot Agastache or Salvia?

I have problems with Z-9 rated salvia in 90’s temperature. I’m in southern Texas. Is Z-9 or 10 rated agastache better all around on the coast? Thanks.

Answered by
Heather on
August 29, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

The problem may be that you are probably on the upper end of what your agastache can take. Zones are rated on the coolest winter time temperatures and not so much on the warmest end in the summer. On top of that, zones are a guideline, so some areas can have a year or even several years where their winter and summer temperatures are much higher or lower than what the zones suggest they will be.

If you are growing an agastache that is rated for zones 5-9 in zone 9 and you are having a warmer than average summer, the plant will struggle. If this is the case with your plants, then I would recommend looking for an agastache that is suitable for up to 10 to help hedge your bets.

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Asked by
knarasi on
August 30, 2011

Q. How to Grow Red Salvia

It’s in a pot now. Can we plant it outside? What is the best spot?

Answered by
Heather on
September 3, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Red salvia only survives in zones 9 or 10 outside year round, so you are not able to plant it in the ground where you live. You can try overwintering it in your house though.

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Asked by
bellen on
April 12, 2012

Q. problems with white perennial salvia

I added 4 white salvia plants to my garden this spring.  Three are doing fine but one is limp, while the blooms are somewhat dry. I am not doing anything different among all 4 plants. All are in a south facing garden.

Thank you for your time.

Answered by
Heather on
April 16, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

If they are recently planted, it is possible that this one has transplant shock. Just like people, when it comes to shock, some plants (even among the same species) handle it better than others. If you suspect shock, this article may help:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/learn-how-to-avoid-and-repair-transplant-shock-in-plants.htm

If they have been there for a few weeks and this suddenly happened, I would look to pests. Check the leaves and roots of the plant closely for signs of pests and treat accordingly.

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Asked by
placefarm on
May 21, 2012

Q. will victoria salvia self seed?

Will Victoria salvia self seed?

Answered by
Nikki on
May 22, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

You can remove the spent blooms of salvia or even take them prior to full bloom to help prevent any re-seeding if this is an issue for you.

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Answered by
coach20years on
May 21, 2012
A.

I have grown Victoria blue salvia for years. If you leave the plants in the ground in the Fall till they are dried up a bit or frost has killed them they will drop seeds and the following Spring there will be hundreds of new plants growing where you had the old plants. You can then dig them up when several inches tall and relocate them.

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