Top Questions About Philodendron Plants

Click on links below to jump to that question.

Questions About Philodendron Plants

Asked by
Anonymous on
April 19, 2019

Q. How can I care for my Philodendren?

We have a Philodendren(sp?) that was indoors and got wilted from the Heater running in the AM. We transplanted it into a larger clay pot and when we did found the roots were are curled and bound up like a fist. It started doing better outside. It loves the cool nights(45-55F) and days are 60-70F outside at present but it has started wilting again. Watering does not seem to be an issue as we check daily.
When it was repotted we used good store bought soil from Ace with controlled release fertilizer. We have had this plant for many years and love it so are asking for advice.
What do you think are possible causes for its wilting as if it needs water but doesn\’t.
Thank you for any help you can give. Merci

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
April 19, 2019
A.

These are sensitive to anything under about 50 degrees. This will cause wilting that may not show immediately. They will need a very light, and airy soil. Anything heavy will retain too much water which will kill it. Do you know if this is the vine type, or tree type? This will vary the care slightly.

Make sure to only water these when the soil is almost completely dry, as these can be sensitive to root rot.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/philodendron/caring-for-philodendrons.htm

00
Was this answer useful?
Join Us - Sign up to get all the latest gardening tips!
Asked by
Abbyee on
May 19, 2019
South Australia

Q. Philodendron leaves turning yellow

Hi all!
My philodendron has two leaves that are turning yellow and I’m unsure why, so thought I would hop on here to see if I could find an answer.
I water about once a week, so the soil is left to dry out a little in between each watering. However, I went away and forgot to water it for a few weeks recently, so could this maybe be an under watering problem? The plant receives pretty bright indirect light for most of the day.
If you have any ideas what this could be please let me know! I don’t want to loose him!!

Answered by
BushDoctor on
May 20, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

These are well adapted for low light situations. Usually this is caused by a little too much light, probably exacerbated by the dry spell. Outdoors, once established, they can handle quite a bit more light. Indoors, it will get sensitive to it as it adapts to being indoors.

It may, or may not recover the damage already done, but as long as you keep on top of its care, then the new growth will come out before you know it.

If you want to give it an all purpose fertilizer at this time, you can do so. Just make sure to follow all instructions on the packaging.

This article will give you more information: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/philodendron/fiddleleaf-philodendron-care.htm

10
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
Anonymous on
August 20, 2019

Q. Powder like substance on philodendron vine

have sprayed with several different things and washed with dish detergent just keeps coming back.

Answered by
GKH_Susan on
August 21, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

If the whole vine is not affected you can pinch off the places with infection. Here are ways to treat the powdery mildew fungus.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/hpgen/powdery-mildew-treatment.htm

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
Anonymous on
September 28, 2019

Q. I have a 47-year old lacy tree philodendron. It has been living in a specially built greenhouse for the past 4 years.

I think that the plant has outgrown the space. I am trying to find a contractor who specializes in greenhouses to give me a price for a larger greenhouse.

Answered by
GKH_Susan on
September 30, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

Oh my goodness! That is unbelievable! We don't make recommendations but your local extension agent might. Good luck!

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
Anonymous on
October 20, 2019

Q. I had 2 Lacy tree philodendron plants. One died. Can I cut the top of the other and start a new plant?

I have had these plants from my Grandmother, who produced more plants from cuttings, for decades. They were brought into the garage last Winter and I was not consistently watering them. I want to cut what I have to start a new plant. Although my grandmother instructed me on how to do it using root stimulator, I can’t recall exactly the entire procedure. Can you advise?

Answered by
GKH_Susan on
October 21, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

Philodendron plants are fairly easy to propagate. Use scissors or a razor cutter to cut a stem from the surviving plant. Remove all but a few leaves from the bottom of the stem. Dip the bare stem into whatever root hormone you're using, and plant the slip in fresh potting soil, deep enough so that at least a few nodes from the cut leaves are covered in soil. Keep the soil damp. New roots will form within twenty days or so.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/philodendron/caring-for-philodendrons.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/philodendron/tree-philodendron-houseplants.htm

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
dr.hassan07 on
November 4, 2019
6112

Q. How Close Can I Plant A Philodenron Bipinnatifidum To The House?

I have an area designated for tropical looking plants, and had a philodenron bipinnatifidum that i want to plant there. It’s within 1.5 meters to the house, and also has a weed mat underneath. I am concerned if the roots are going to cause any structural damage to the house in future?

Answered by
BushDoctor on
November 5, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

They aren't known for destructive roots, and it seems that the area is far enough away to be of little concern. I don't see any indication that this could be harmful.

This article will help you with care for these plants: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/philodendron/outdoor-philodendron-care.htm

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
Anonymous on
December 9, 2019

Q. Yellow leaves for a plant – too moist air, too hot or lack of elements in soil?

I watered the plant at the end of October for the last time. Since that, the soil has been wet for a longer time. In November, when the temperatures started to drop down and it was cool in the flat, there was a bit of mold on the topsoil. Now the soil is not that wet anymore, it is more dry and it is warmer in the flat, but maybe there is still moisture in the air or other problems for the plant? Maybe I have kept the plant too close to a heater to make the soil more dry? Looking forward to hearing from you!

Answered by
GKH_Susan on
December 11, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

Too much or too little water is often the reason for leaf edges to yellow. Philodendrons need moist soil but not wet. Provide good drainage so the plant is not sitting in water. Go ahead and remove the leaves that are discolored.

Here are more reasons for yellow or brown leaves:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/philodendron/brown-philodendron-leaves.htm

00
Was this answer useful?
1 15 16 17 18
Learn

Learn From
Your Peers on
Our Blog

Visit Our Blog
The website that started it all!
Main Website

Do you know a lot about gardening?
Become a GKH Gardening Expert

Learn More