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Asked by
cynthialinn1 on
June 30, 2012

Q. My Calibrachoa lost all of its flowers

My Calibrachoa lost all of its flowers and has not produced and new ones. The plant is healthy, but no signs of new flowers.

Answered by
Nikki on
June 30, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

To improve blooming, you might want to add some phosphorus to the soil. Bone meal is a good source for this, or use a fertilizer that has a higher phosphorus ratio.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
April 25, 2014

Q. Separating Million Bells

I bought 4 containers of million bells – 2 orange and 2 yellow. The area I am growing them in is a little small. Can I separate the plants before planting to make them smaller to fit my space? Or will this kill the plant?

Answered by
Nikki on
November 30, -0001
Certified Expert
A.

As long as you can ensure that each division has adequate roots, then it should be fine to divide the plant.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 14, 2015

Q. Budworm infestation

I have been growing calibrachoa hybrids (Million Bells) in flower pots for years with no problems whatsoever. I had twelve pots full of the most lush, beautiful blooms this year until budworms! I went to war on them but to no avail and am furious. I want to replant but first need to arm myself properly to fend off these pests. I assume it is necessary to replace all the potting soil but what is the most effective weapon as far as a pesticide, etc?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
June 15, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

This article should help, though it's directed to roses it would still apply to your situation as well: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/budworms-roses.htm

Yes replace the soil. You may even want to sterilize it. This article will help with that: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/sterilizing-soil.htm

Since they like to overwinter in pots, one of the best ways to prevent these little buggers is by replacing and repotting the soil BEFORE overwintering your plants. This way if there are any pupa in the soil, you will be getting rid of them and your plants will then be growing in good, clean pest-free soil.

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Asked by
Halkanur on
June 11, 2017

Q. Million bells

Why are they only blooming sporadically?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
June 13, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Are they receiving full sun? They may need more sunlight.
Also over fertilizing can cause lack of flowering.

Too much nitrogen inhibits flowers.
Here is a link to refresh you on the care requirements.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/million-bells/calibrachoa-million-bells.htm

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Asked by
Kayla Bellamy on
June 18, 2017

Q. Million bells

I received this hanging basket for mothers day, it had been doing great! Growing and blooming like crazy, it was beautiful. We left for vacation and my mother took care of the flowers while we were gone. She said she kept check in the soil and it was moist. When I returned from the beach I noticed it looked kind of wilted and now almost a week later it looks as if the top of the plant is sting. Also, it seems as if one aide is wilted and the other side isn’t. What happened to my flowers and how can I help them? I’m so disappointed because they were doing so well and then all of a sudden they start to die. I’ll attach pictures for reference. Thanks

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
June 20, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

From just the image it could be due to watering issues, watering from overhead could cause fungus issues--it is best to water the soil and not down into the crown of the plant.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/million-bells/calibrachoa-million-bells.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
August 2, 2017

Q. Something is eating million bells hanging plant

My million bells hanging plant has something eating either the whole bloom or parts of it, some blooms have big holes in them. I don’t see any bugs. What is a natural spray to use to get rid of these?

Answered by
nikki-phipps on
August 3, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Neem Oil is a good organic choice to treat most sucking pests on plants. Neem Oil is safe for people, pets and bees!

Here is a link with more information: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/pesticides/neem-oil-uses.htm

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