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  • Answered by
    AnnsGreeneHaus on
    January 29, 2013
    A.

    I wouldn't think that a vegetable covered in bat poop would be very appetizing, even when washed. At the very least, try to "sterilize" the produce before using. Can you move the bat house or the garden? Bat guano is great for the garden, but I wouldn't want it coating edibles. This article could help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/composting/manures/bat-guano-fertilizer.htm

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  • Answered by
    AnnsGreeneHaus on
    March 14, 2013
    A.

    Chicken manure and bedding (collectively called poultry litter) can be turned in to the top several inches of garden soil and left to compost in place, in which case soil organisms aid in the composting process and nitrogen is released directly into the surrounding soil. The Washington State University Extension Service advises that pathogens in chicken manure, particularly E. coli, can present an ongoing human health hazard in crops harvested where fresh manure has been spread. They recommend waiting at least 120 days from the time you turn chicken manure into the soil until the time of harvest of any crops intended to be eaten by humans uncooked (such as strawberries).

    The following article discusses composting with chicken manure: http://seattletilth.org/learn/resources-1/city-chickens/compostingchickenmanure

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  • Answered by
    AnnsGreeneHaus on
    April 3, 2013
    A.

    There are two schools of thought on applying rabbit manure to the garden. Some gardeners are cautious about potential pathogens and prefer to toss them onto the compost pile as a precaution. For some, adding poop to your veggie garden sounds (on some level) suspect.
    I'll be honest, I haven't heard of there ever being a problem - but it's worth mentioning especially if you're adding them to a vegetable garden. Then there are those gardeners that apply the rabbit pellets directly to the garden without a second thought. This is one of my practices; but I'm daring like that. The above taken from this link:
    http://www.vegetablegardener.com/item/8156/rabbit-manure-in-the-garden

    Andd this article may help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/composting/manures/rabbit-manure-compost.htm

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    April 10, 2013
    Certified Expert
    A.

    When adding manure to the garden, it often helps to compost it. You can then amend your garden soil with this compost and no other fertilizing should be necessary. Here is more information: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/composting/manures/rabbit-manure-compost.htm

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  • Answered by
    AnnsGreeneHaus on
    May 28, 2013
    A.

    I would compost it before using.

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  • Answered by
    AnnsGreeneHaus on
    July 24, 2013
    A.

    I would imagine that quail manure would be like chicken manure. The following links contain the information you requested: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/composting/manures/chicken-manure-fertilizer.htm

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/composting/manures/chicken-manure-fertilizer.htm

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