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Top Questions About Mallow Plants

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Questions About Mallow Plants

  • Answered by
    Downtoearthdigs on
    September 9, 2018
    A.

    Now would be a good time to trim it very lightly, as it starts to go dormant. Leaf drop is common when humidity or temperature changes quickly. It would be well suited for indoors. Here is an article that will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/flowering-maple/growing-flowering-maple.htm

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    May 20, 2019
    Certified Expert
    A.

    It does sound like a fungal infection. This has an easy cure, since it can fight off the infection for the start of its growing season.

    You will need a handful of DOLOMITIC LIME and a tablespoon of WETTABLE SULFUR per plant.

    These together, will correct the fungal issue. It is not a bad idea to keep these ingredients around to apply once per year to the soil as a preventative.

    This article will give you information on growing Mallows: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/common-mallow/growing-common-mallow.htm

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  • Answered by
    MichiganDot on
    May 20, 2019
    A.

    All the plants in the Mallow family are prone to "rust" with hollyhocks being the most popular ornamental that is affected. The bumps are orange which is where the "rust" name comes from. Here is another article that discusses what to do if your mallow family plant has rust. https://hort.extension.wisc.edu/articles/hollyhock-rust/ Rust survives winter so it is vital to carefully remove all plant material at the end of the season. Good sanitation includes removing affected leaves as soon as they are noticed. Good air circulation is important in preventing all fungal diseases which is hard to achieve when plants are against a structure. You may want to space them out further but this is no sure fix as hollyhocks and the like are rust magnets, unfortunately.

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  • Answered by
    GKH_Susan on
    September 1, 2019
    Certified Expert
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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    April 15, 2020
    Certified Expert
    A.

    This looks more like one of the many mallow species:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/category/ornamental/flowers/common-mallow

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    June 8, 2020
    Certified Expert
    A.

    It is likely that the roots were disturbed during the transplant. This will be the issue. It will likely take awhile to recover, but the only thing that you can do is give it proper care. Too much care will be counterproductive and likely kill the plant.

    Here is an article for more information on the plant's care:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/common-mallow/growing-common-mallow.htm

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    June 13, 2022
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Unfortunately, your photos did not come through. I am unable to see the plants in question. This collection of articles will help you to know more about Mallows:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/common-mallow

    Your local extension service can help if you take a sample or photos up to them. This link will help you to find the closest one to you:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/extension-search

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