Locust Trees

Click on links below to jump to that question.

  1. Locust Tree After Hail Storm Last Summer
  2. Potted Tree Outgrew the Pot
  3. Locust Tree Seedlings to Eliminate Without Killing Grass
  4. Black Locust Tree in Pot
  5. Robinia Frisia
  6. Robinia Tree
  7. How to Stop Suckers From Growing and Roots Coming Up
Asked by Anonymous on May 20, 2011
Locust Tree After Hail Storm Last Summer

Last summer we had a terrible wind and hail storm. My sapling Shade Master locust tree was damaged. The hail took off a lot of bark but did not take it much past the green under bark and did not garret the tree either. I hoped it would recover. This spring it is coming out, but the ends of the branches are dead and a lot of the greenery seems to be sucker type. I’m wondering if I should cut the dead areas of the branches back and watch the growth to see what is suckers or regular new growth? Should I consider the tree lost and start over?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert
Asked by Anonymous on June 24, 2011
Potted Tree Outgrew the Pot

A locust tree sprouted in an outdoor plastic 16-inch pot and rooted itself in the ground below the pot. It’s now about 10 feet high with a 3 inch trunk. We like its location and would like to encourage it to grow. Will it survive if we remove the pot? The trunk is near the edge of the pot and that side of the pot has broken away so some of the below grade trunk is already exposed. The less desirable alternative would be to build a permanent container to the height of the pot.

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Yes, it should be okay to remove the pot, and I would actually recommend that you do so. In fact, it may need to be replanted into the ground or even placed into a larger container. To transplant the tree, this article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/learn-how-to-avoid-and-repair-transplant-shock-in-plants.htm

Was this answer useful?
00
Asked by Anonymous on July 8, 2011
Locust Tree Seedlings to Eliminate Without Killing Grass

The tree came down this spring. Now there are volunteers all over my yard and neighbors’ yards. I have pulled them out, used the weedeater, etc. Is there a product I can safely use or just wait for them to die-out over the next few years?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert
Was this answer useful?
00
Asked by Anonymous on November 22, 2011
Black Locust Tree in Pot

Can you plant a Robinia pseudoacacia L.  in a pot?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

You can but there are certain things to consider when growing trees in containers. These articles will provide additinal information as well as other tree suggestions for future reference: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/containers/how-to-grow-container-trees.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/growing-trees-in-containers.htm

Was this answer useful?
00
Asked by Anonymous on April 10, 2012
Robinia Frisia

The tree is nine years old. It was a bit sick last year with a fungal infection diagnosed. This year it shows no sign of life. Have I lost it?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Are the stems (branches) still green? This article will help you determine if the plant is still alive: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/how-to-tell-if-a-plant-is-dead-and-how-to-recover-an-almost-dead-plant.htm

Was this answer useful?
00
Asked by Anonymous on September 24, 2012
Robinia Tree

How can I move a young Robinia tree and when is the best time to move?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Fall is a good time for transplanting. If you cannot do so now, then spring would be ideal. Get as much of the roots as possible and replant in a suitable location. In order to reduce the amount of stress on the plant from moving it, you may want to consider cutting it back. This article will also help:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/learn-how-to-avoid-and-repair-transplant-shock-in-plants.htm

Was this answer useful?
00
Asked by makini9 on September 9, 2013
How to Stop Suckers From Growing and Roots Coming Up

Two years ago I had an old Locust tree removed and stump grounded. Replaced it with red maple, but now the roots appear to be coming up and the yard is filled with suckers from the Locust. How do I get rid of the suckers and what do I do about the roots of the young maple pushing up above ground?

ANSWERS
AnnsGreeneHaus

Depending on variety of maple, you may not be able to be root free above ground. Some maples have more prominent roots above ground than others.
As far as the locust is concerned, if it were mine, I'd purchase an herbicide with 2-4D as an ingredient. Immediately after cutting back a sucker, pour a couple tablespoons of herbicide over exposed stem. This should kill the sucker and any others along that particular root/rhizome.

Was this answer useful?
00
1 2 3

Not finding what you're looking for?

Ask A Question