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  • Answered by
    GKH_Susan on
    October 15, 2019
    Certified Expert
    A.

    If you have a south facing window for them, you can do without the grow light. I don't know how much your plants have spread, but buy containers that will be about an inch wider than your leaf spread. If that seems too wide, you can have part of the leaves overlap the edge of the pot. They do not like sitting in water, so be sure the pot drains well. When watering, wait till the soil is very dry before watering again. Lamb's ear is susceptible to root rot. Here is more:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/lambs-ear/lambs-ear-plant.htm

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  • Answered by
    GKH_Susan on
    August 2, 2020
    Certified Expert
    A.

    They are easy to overwater, even outside. Are you going to plant it outside in the garden where it can spread? It's not really an indoor plant. You can keep it in a pot outside if you like, but then you really need to make sure you don't overwater, because in a pot, it's even harder for the soil to dry out.

    I would plant it outside if possible. If you must keep it in a container, it wouldn't hurt to change out the soil if you've kept it moist. Lamb's ear likes it dry.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/lambs-ear/lambs-ear-plant.htm

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  • Answered by
    GKH_Susan on
    October 7, 2020
    Certified Expert
    A.

    You are in hardiness zone 7a and lamb's ear is hardy to zone 4. So, technically, you could leave it in a pot all winter and it should regrow in spring. The rule of thumb is if the hardiness zone of the plant is 2 zones lower than yours, it should be able to withstand winter in a container. If you want to be on the safe side, you can plant it in the ground.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/lambs-ear/lambs-ear-plant.htm

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  • Answered by
    GKH_Susan on
    March 13, 2021
    Certified Expert
    A.

    It's best to wait till spring because if you prune before winter's end, the plant is vulnerable to even more damage. The thought is that leaving the damaged foliage may protect against winter's snow and ice. But you can use your judgement as to when you think the worst of winter is over. A freeze could affect new growth, but snow generally protects plants from the harsh cold. If the new growth does die back, you should still get more new growth.

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    September 6, 2022
    Certified Expert
    A.

    In the future, please do not put your email, here, to the public. I will remove it, this time.

    It is hard to say from the photos. If there are snails and slugs in the area, then this could be an indication. They can leave a slime behind.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/insects/organic-snail-control.htm

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/insects/kill-garden-slugs.htm

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/lambs-ear/lambs-ear-plant.htm

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