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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 9, 2011

Q. Juniper Bush

I plan on removing five large juniper bushes from my yard and then planting something else. The area is covered with shade the majority of the time. I have noticed, of course, that the ‘needles’ from the junipers that have been shed will absolutely kill anything that tries to grow under or close by the junipers. So, will I have any problem if I try to plant something else where the juniper once was? Also, do I need to completely remove the stump from the juniper, or can I just plant around it?

Answered by
pink on
June 12, 2011
A.

I removed a juniper and planted something else in it's place I did remove the stump, and since my spot was shady I planted hostas and ferns they are going on three years and doing great,but I cleaned up the area real good making sure I removed as much of the needles as possible, good luck

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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 17, 2011

Q. Junipers and Weeds

I have planted junipers on a bank. They continue to be invaded by weeds, vines, small tree beginnings. Is there a way to get rid of and prevent these invaders without killing or harming the junipers?

Asked by
JHelm on
July 4, 2011

Q. What Type of Bushes

What are the bushes that seem to always grow on the side of a house, probably 4′ tall? I think, not sure, they look like some species of juniper, but if so, what kind? Oh, they also have kind of thin branches too, and sometimes people square them to look better.

Answered by
Heather on
July 7, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Boxwood, yews and junipers are the most popular foundation shrubs and all can be trimmed like you describe. This article has information on the many choices available for foundation planting:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/shgen/foundation-plants.htm

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Asked by
Sheila Hil on
January 13, 2012

Q. When can I transplant Juniper?

We recently purchased a home in SC.  There are some mature juniper plants that I would like to move to NC, which is in a colder area (10 degrees or so) and I need to know when I can move them successfully.  Our soil here is very sandy and the NC soil is more clay like.

Answered by
Nikki on
January 13, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

Sometime around April/May would be better for planting. In the meantime, you could place them in containers. Also, if you can ensure that the majority of the roots and surrounding soil is lifted and replanted in an area with suitable growing conditions, you'll have a greater chance of success. To reduce shock, trimming may help. Here is an article that you may find helpful: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/learn-how-to-avoid-and-repair-transplant-shock-in-plants.htm

Since the soil may not be so great, amending it would improve success as well. Here is more information: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/organic/compost-for-organic-gardens.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/amending-sandy-soil.htm

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Asked by
Pepper2011 on
September 15, 2012

Q. Our juniper isn’t growing!

Help! We planted 6 creeping juniper about 6 ft. apart on our ditch bank 2 (or 3) years ago hoping it would cover the bank. However, none of the plants have grown one iota! Any help would be very appreciated!

Answered by
Nikki on
September 17, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

I would recommend having a soil test. There may be something lacking in the soil, or something is simply restricting the root growth. Here is more info on growing these plants: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/juniper/growing-creeping-junipers.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
March 25, 2014

Q. On the Junipers

I tested soil around the juniper. The pH readings are:

#1 is 3.0
#2 is 5.0
#3 is 5.5
#4 is 4.5
#5 is 8.5

#1 is dead. Can you help me? Thank you.

Answered by
Nikki on
March 25, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

It appears that your soil is acidic, and in the case of #1 & # 4, very acidic. When soil is very acidic, it can be hard for plants to take up the types of nutrients they need. #5 is rather alkaline, which can also cause issues. You need to lower the acidity of the soil where the pH is low and raise it where the pH is high. Ideally, for most plants, you wants a pH of 5-7. These articles will help with what you can do to regulate your soil pH: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/raise-acid-level-soil.htm, https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/lower-acid-soil.htm

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