Top Questions About Japanese Cherry Trees

Click on links below to jump to that question.

Questions About Japanese Cherry Trees

Asked by
Anonymous on
March 31, 2014

Q. Japanese Cherry Tree

My cherry tree started to bloom then was attacked by bumblebees and they killed they flowers. Now the tree has no leaves and just looks like a twig. What can I do to get it to get leaves?

Answered by
Nikki on
March 31, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

You need to determine if it is still alive. This article will help you determine that: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/how-to-tell-if-a-plant-is-dead-and-how-to-recover-an-almost-dead-plant.htm If it is still alive, just give it some time and it will regrow its leaves. Keep a close eye on it during this time, as trees are more susceptible to disease and pests when stressed liked this. If you see signs of disease or pests, treat the tree for them ASAP.

00
Was this answer useful?
Join Us - Sign up to get all the latest gardening tips!
Asked by
Anonymous on
May 22, 2014

Q. Will Japanese Cherry Trees Grow Well in Rhode Island?

My husband gave me a Japanese Cherry tree for my birthday. We’re trying to figure out the exact placement, near or far from the house, front or back of the house, etc. Is this tree hardy enough for Rhode Island? We have a huge tree already established on the side of our yard, which looks like another variety of a cherry tree. What exactly is our zone? Thanks so much for your assistance.

Answered by
Nikki on
May 22, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

These trees are hardy in Zones 5-8 and, since you are Zones 6-7, you should have no problem growing it in your area. This map will help pinpoint your exact zone, depending on where you're located in Rhode Island: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/planting-zones/rhode-island-planting-zones.htm

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
deemar1n1 on
March 13, 2015
6

Q. graft a japanese weeping tree

Heavy snow buried my Japanese weeper. When snow thawed, I noticed the very tip was lopped off. Is it possible to salvage the head from where the branches sprout? It reached 3.5 feet and was blooming and growing beautifully last season. I love it and hope I can salvage it.

Answered by
shelley on
March 13, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

So sorry your weeping tree sustained a winter injury. When a tree has broken branches, the best course of action is to get the wound as neat and clean as you can. I would prune the injured area, if you have wiggle room to do so, so it is a clean cut.

You asked about grafting. You could attempt it with that broken branch via a whip graft but grafts aren't always successful and I feel that you really do not have to pursue that path. Your weeping cherry in its present state is salvageable. It will grow branches from the existing branches and will eventually fill in so you do not notice the injury zone.

For more information on grafting trees, please visit the following link:
http://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/yard-garden/fruit/grafting-and-budding-fruit-trees/

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
joan.borkowsky on
March 22, 2016
12768

Q. Japanese cherry blossom trees

Our Japanese cherry blossom trees produce leave but perhaps only one blossom. They were blossoming when we purchased them. Help

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
March 22, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Improper pruning can remove blossoms. Pruning should be following blooming.
Cold snaps or temperature drops after buds have formed will kill the buds.

Nitrogen is important but too much nitrogen will inhibit flowering.
Skip fertilizing unless a soil test shows a lack of it.

You can apply some Phosphorous to help promote flowering.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/bone-meal-fertilizer.htm

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
Anonymous on
March 27, 2016

Q. Yoshino cherry tree

Will it grow well in zone 5b?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
March 28, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Yoshino cherry trees are rated for USDA plant hardiness zones 5–8 so you should be fine.

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
johnsilvernail120 on
August 11, 2016
13825

Q. Cherry tree pollination

Will Kanzan cherries pollinate with any fruit cherries?

Answered by
Alisma on
August 12, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

I am not sure about that particular variety, but typically ornamental cherries will not pollinate fruit cherries. A fruit cherry (of any variety but the same species) is the most likely to pollinate your fruit trees.

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
dkamarinos on
January 20, 2017
Rockledge, fl, 32955

Q. Abnormal growth on Kwanzan Cherry Tree

Today, after getting home from work, I closely examined my brand new Kwanzan Cherry Tree that was planted around mid December. It sprouted its first stem this month and is now sprouting from many different locations on the trunk. Near the top of the tree, where one of the first stems sprouted, is healthy growth of leaves, except I am seeing dark colored spore-like potential growths. To make me more suspicious that this was unusual and possibly not growth of the plant, but maybe sacs laid by insects, were ants climbing right near the top where these sprouts are located. I’ve seen ants before on our roses, where I have found aphids attacking the blossoms. These roses are in the same bed as the newly planted Kwanzan.

I’ve sprayed pyrethrin on the roses to control the aphids from time to time, and it’s been very effective. Without getting ahead of myself, I’d like to ask the opinions of experienced gardeners that are familiar with the Kwanzan Cherry Tree. Attached are photos of the young tree, and the spore-like growths are visible in the shots taken. Is this natural growth of the tree or pest eggs/sacs I should be concerned about? I appreciate the advice anyone can give, thank you!

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
January 20, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Great!

00
Was this answer useful?

Answered by
dkamarinos on
January 20, 2017
A.

Nevermind! Searched online and found photos of new growth on the trees, and found out its normal, thanks!

00
Was this answer useful?
1 2
Learn

Learn From
Your Peers on
Our Blog

Visit Our Blog
The website that started it all!
Main Website

Do you know a lot about gardening?
Become a GKH Gardening Expert

Learn More