Top Questions About Jalapeno Pepper Plants

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Questions About Jalapeno Pepper Plants

Asked by
garden_dummy on
July 4, 2011

Q. My vegetables died

This is my first year gardening. I started growing tomatoes, jalapeno peppers, green peppers, broccoli, lettuce and cabbage straight from the seed into the ground. I watered them every day except for rainy days and a week later everything except the jalapeno peppers was about an inch tall. But then it seemed like a day or two later everything just died. And now I have nothing except lettuce, which were in a self watering pot, and are still growing strong. I did use Miracle Gro granulars. Could I have possibly over watered my garden to the point where they drowned and died? Or is it something else?

Answered by
Heather on
July 7, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

If you were starting them from seed in pots, they may have gotten a fungus called damping off. This article will help with preventing that:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/seeds/what-is-damping-off.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 7, 2011

Q. My Pepper Plants Are Turning Black

My bell peppers and jalapenos are turning black, so are half of the stems. We have cut them open and they seem to be healthy. The leaves are healthy. The whole plant in general seems to be healthy, but they are turning black. What is the problem? Please help.

Answered by
Nikki on
July 7, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

If they are turning black from the bottom, this is blossom end rot. This article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/pepper-blossom-end-rot.htm

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Asked by
jdk1115 on
August 1, 2011

Q. how do I can or dry jalapeno peppers

I have grown some jalapeno peppers and I was wondering how to can peppers or dry peppers or whatever you do to keep them.

Answered by
Susan75023 on
August 4, 2011
Asked by
Anonymous on
August 10, 2011

Q. Jalapeno Peppers

What causes brown lines on jalapeno peppers?

Answered by
Nikki on
August 11, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

These are just growth marks. The pepper grows so fast, that sometimes the skin cannot keep up. It cracks a little and heals, which causes the lines. They are completely safe to eat.

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Asked by
olgalita on
May 13, 2012

Q. What ate my jalapeno leaves overnight?

I went to check on my jalapeno plants and one of them lost all of its leaves overnight! The other jalapeno plants are fine. . .

olgalita

Answered by
Nikki on
May 14, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

The most common culprit for this is slugs. They can literally devour plants overnight. Read this article for some advice on getting rid of them: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/facts-about-slugs-and-how-to-kill-garden-slugs.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
September 25, 2012

Q. Jalapeno Problem

I have 2 Jalapeno plants with an abundance of peppers; however, in the last week black discoloration has started to appear at the joints of stems and on some of the peppers. What is this and is there anything that I can do about it?

Answered by
Nikki on
September 25, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

One thing that I can think of that could be causing the issue is a condition called stem scald, which normally happens on the main stem. What happens is a heat source can focus heat on a part of the stem and it wilts. It is known to happen when plastic is used and it focuses the heat onto a part of the stem.

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Asked by
dwhit75 on
October 10, 2012
Austin, TX

Q. Preparing My Vegetables for Winter

I live in Texas, although winters are mild here, we tend to have a handful of days below 0. I have a raised garden that is 6×6 and 2ft deep. It contains a tomato plant, 4 jalapeno plants, and 2 serrano plants. What can I do to protect them from the winter?

Answered by
Heather on
October 26, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

You could try hoop houses or some other form of temporary greenhouse enclosure over the plants, but to be honest, they really don't do well in temps below 50F and will die if exposed to temps under 40F. Even with a structure over the plants, it is unlikely they would survive the nights where the temps dipped below 0F.

These plants are treated as annuals. You can however pre-plant seeds for next year, which would result in earlier fruit. This article will explain more:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/vgen/preseeding-vegetables.htm

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