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  • Answered by
    maryhdyer on
    February 10, 2015
    Certified Expert
    A.

    This article should help you uniformly prune your Indian Hawthorne:
    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/indian-hawthorn/indian-hawthorn-pruning.htm

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  • Answered by
    Downtoearthdigs on
    April 11, 2015
    A.

    Hawthorne trees are susceptible to a number of diseases. It may be worth you and your neighbors have the trees inspected by an Arborist to correctly identify the issue.

    Here is a link to an article.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/hawthorn/growing-hawthorn-trees.htm

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  • Answered by
    shelley on
    May 8, 2015
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Rest assured - your indian hawthorn will not die and you did not impact next year's blooms. The best time to prune is immediately after the flowers fade, before new buds begin to form. Since you pruned them before they were done blooming, then new buds had not formed yet.

    For more information on pruning indian hawthorns, please visit the following link:
    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/indian-hawthorn/indian-hawthorn-pruning.htm

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  • Answered by
    shelley on
    May 12, 2015
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Indian Hawthorne leaf spot is a destructive disease. The following link (PDF) will explain it in more detail. The symptoms match those you were referring to in the other thread about red spots.

    https://bit.ly/1G1p7c7

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  • Answered by
    ann-478 on
    May 12, 2015
    A.

    diaeses in indian howthorne

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  • Answered by
    robinholly on
    June 7, 2015
    A.

    Indian Hawthorns, especially the older varieties, are prone to leaf spot disease, which spreads plant to plant by either rain splashing or irrigation systems. It is a virus. It looks like the virus from your pic. I have these plants also. Mine have the virus from time to time. The best thing you can do is keep up very good hygiene. Remove the leaves from underneath them and renew a thin layer of mulch often. Bag the leaves that have the virus on them and discard them.
    Hope they improve!

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  • Answered by
    Downtoearthdigs on
    June 23, 2015
    A.

    I believe this to be entoomosporium leaf spot.
    There is a treatment, but preventing it is the key.
    Here are a few links to help you decide a plan or if replacing the shrubs may be the best solution.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/photinia/photinia-leaf-spot.htm

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/disease/plant-leaf-spots.htm

    http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/plants/landscape/shrubs/hgic1078.html

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