Top Questions About Grapefruit Trees

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Questions About Grapefruit Trees

Asked by
Anonymous on
July 17, 2011

Q. Tree Sap Flowing From Grapefruit Tree

My grapefruit tree has a pinkish sap oozing from the branches next to the trunk and the grapefruit is turning yellow. Also, a couple of small branches have wilted leaves on them, so I cut them so that the other branches would not get infected. I really don’t know what the problem is and what to do to correct it. Your help and suggestions are appreciated.

Answered by
Nikki on
July 18, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

A wound in the trunk of a citrus tree can lead to loose bark and oozing sap. The oozing sap could be a symptom of gummosis - a condition caused by infection by Phytophthora fungi. Gummosis does not cause rapid decline of the tree, but fruit production often decreases. Viral diseases cannot be cured, but providing good care helps.

On the other hand, oozing of sap on citrus is not all that uncommon. Many times there is no particular known cause that can be identified. The oozing frequently does not last very long, and clears up on it own without any noticeable harm to the tree.

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Asked by
jm2525 on
July 23, 2011

Q. Grapefruit Tree

My grapefruit tree has leaf canker. How to treat this problem?

Answered by
Susan75023 on
July 24, 2011
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Asked by
Anonymous on
October 6, 2011

Q. Grapefruit Ripening

If grapefruits are removed from the branches of the tree before they are ripened, will they ripen enough to eat? How long will this take and how green can the fruit be when it is removed from the tree?

Answered by
Nikki on
October 6, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Most citrus fruits, especially grapefruit, do not ripen once they are picked. In fact, grapefruits are best left on the tree awhile, as they will become sweeter. Grapefruit harvesting takes place in fall. When the fruits are yellow or golden in color, then they are ready for harvesting.

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Asked by
tippybaker on
November 25, 2011

Q. why does my grapefruit have thick skin and less flesh

Why does my grapefruit have thick skin and less flesh? I have had the tree about 4 years.

Answered by
Nikki on
November 25, 2011
Certified Expert
Asked by
aljobev on
January 29, 2012

Q. Grapefruit

My grapefruit tree has been in the ground 3 years and just this year produced 1 grapefruit. Fertilized (8-2-8) but have not been to successful with it.

Answered by
Nikki on
January 30, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

There are two things that it might be. The first is that citrus trees generally need 2-6 years before they are mature enough to fruit. Your tree may not be quite mature enough to fruit.

Another possibility is that the tree may have too much nitrogen. This causes a lot of foliage to grow with little to no flowers and fruit.

The following article should be of some help to you: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/citrus/fertilizing-citrus-trees-best-practices-for-citrus-fertilizing.htm

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Asked by
jls on
March 14, 2012

Q. Why are my Citrus sparse with leaves and blooms?

When I moved into my current home my citrus thrived for several years with little attention on my part. Last year I started watering on a schedule (every 2-3 weeks as well as fertilizer 2-3 times a year).

This year my grapefruit had only 3 fruits and my navel about 5-10. My tangelo (located near my house in the shade) has half of usual fruit.

This spring they have few leaves and fewer blooms – I don’t know what to do.

Answered by
Nikki on
March 15, 2012
Certified Expert
Asked by
Deeyanara on
May 11, 2012

Q. Problem growing grapefruit tree in Zone 9

I live in the desert area of twenty-nine Palms Calif. (zone 9) and my small grapefruit tree is not growing. The leaves are brownish yellow and just not doing anything that shows it is healthy. Please help. . . what do I need to do to have a healthy tree? Thank you for your valuable time I appreciate it.
Mr. Jepsen

Answered by
Nikki on
May 12, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

I would have your soil tested. Yellowing of the leaves is typically either an iron or nitrogen deficiency. When was the last time you fertilized the tree? It may need nutrients. If you have not been fertilizing, start doing so and, regardless, have the soil tested to see if you have any nutrient deficiencies that need to be corrected. Here is more information on fertilizing citrus trees: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/citrus/fertilizing-citrus-trees-best-practices-for-citrus-fertilizing.htm

In addition, it could be a watering issue, possibly not enough. Citrus plants require lots of water. This article should help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/citrus/tip-on-water-requirements-for-citrus-trees.htm

This article will have some other reasons for yellowing leaves: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/plant-leaves-turn-yellow.htm

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