Top Questions About Elephant Ear Plants

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Questions About Elephant Ear Plants

Asked by
bitterbug.19 on
July 11, 2019
72761

Q. I just dug up and transplanted a baby elephant ear in a pot. Its small leaves on the bottom are yellow

The leaves at the bottom are dead.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 12, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

Yellow leaves could indicate watering issues; too much or too little.
It could also be disease, pests or lack of nutrients.
These articles will help you review the care needed.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/bulbs/elephant-ear/growing-elephant-ears-indoors.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/bulbs/elephant-ear/elephant-ears-taking-over.htm

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Asked by
Reydap on
July 11, 2019
50014

Q. Why does the outer edge of the leaf get yellow?

It is an elephant ear plant.

Answered by
BushDoctor on
July 13, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

This appears to be Phyllosticta leaf spot. It is quite common. Treatment will be a fungicide. There are several that you can choose from. This article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/using-fungicides-in-garden.htm

This article will help you to diagnose common issues with elephant ear plants: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/bulbs/elephant-ear/elephant-ear-plant-diseases.htm

This article will help you to grow them: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/bulbs/elephant-ear/growing-elephant-ear-plants.htm

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Asked by
joaomarcelo0914 on
July 13, 2019
Port Saint Lucie

Q. Elephant Ear Leaves getting too heavy

So I purchased this elephant ear since I purchased it seems to doing fine, the only thing is that I had to cut about 3 or 4 leaves that were getting too heavy and bending over. It seems that every time a new leaf comes out it puts pressure on the outer leaves causing them to go down slowly until they can stand up no more. So I wonder what can I do to stop the leaves from falling down.

Answered by
BushDoctor on
July 13, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

This can be normal, to an extent. I do see a much lighter shade from the new leaves than I would expect. This leads me to believe that it needs just a little more light.

If you can't provide this indoors, then I could recommend a horticultural light. There are all types, so it will be necessary to research and compare before buying to ensure you are getting the right fixture to suit your needs. Since this doesn't need the brightest of light to flourish, you can get away with relatively low wattage. 100 to 400 hundred watts will be ideal, without going over that.

This article will offer more information with the care of Elephant Ear indoors: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/bulbs/elephant-ear/growing-elephant-ears-indoors.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 14, 2019

Q. elephant plant problem

I have a beautiful large potted plant but the stalks are splitting and the lower leaves are bending low, as it they have lost their structure, facing downwards (not completely) but I I don’t think they are supposed to do that. am i doing something wrong?
I am keeping it well watered and in a large pot

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 16, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

I would suggest making sure you have it protected from wind, even staking the plant may help.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/bulbs/elephant-ear/growing-elephant-ear-plants.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 24, 2019

Q. How tall does a elephant ear plant get?

My sister lives at Forest Hills, KY 41527 She has an Elephant Ear plant that is taller
than the house. I assume it is a perennial. She said it was there when she moved
into the house, which belonged to a mother 1n-law who passed away. Can you give
me some info on this plant.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 24, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

Most are not very hardy, but some are. It sounds like the one planted there is. This will be very easy to care for, as there is not much that will need to be done. Since it is hardy to the area, you will not need to dig it up, unless you just want to divide it to give to others. Unfortunately, some varieties can get well over 15 feet tall, while others remain below a foot tall. It would be hard to tell you what type it was. By now it should be to its mature height by this time of year.

This article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/bulbs/elephant-ear/growing-elephant-ear-plants.htm

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Asked by
gigidregs on
August 15, 2019
78411

Q. I overwatered the elephant ears.

I cut off the yellowed leaves and left the green stems and any green leaves. Some of those
are partially yellow. Should I remove the partially yellowed leaves also. Will leaving just a partial plant, will they ever come back?

Answered by
gigidregs on
August 16, 2019
A.

Very helpful........I had wondered if just cutting off the yellow would be of any benefit so, that is what I will try. I seem to have a habit of loving my plants to death but, with the temperature being over 100 for weeks and no rain, I thought I was being helpful this time. Thank you for your answer.

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Answered by
MichiganDot on
August 15, 2019
A.

If the yellow is unattractive, cut off just the yellow portion. A sick plant needs all the photosynthesis it can muster. Photosynthesis comes from green leaves (chlorophyl). The answer to 'will it come back' depends on whether the tuber or roots have rotted and how long the plant had green leaves before the over-watering took place. I might be tempted to remove the plant and change to drier soil. If mushy roots are encountered, remove these. If the tuber is mush, it is time to buy a new one.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/.../elephant-ear/growing-elephant-ear- plants.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
September 5, 2019

Q. Storing tender perennials, elephant ears, canna, pineapple lilies?

In the past have cut down, removed dirt, stored in milk crates in the cellar.Would like to cut them back, store in the pots they grew in, then put them in the cellar for the winter.  I will not be available during the winter

Answered by
GKH_Susan on
September 8, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

Usually if they are stored in soil in pots, they need an occasional watering during the winter. You would be better off to store them the way you have in past. Here are more options:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/containers/overwintering-container-plants.htm

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