Top Questions About Devil’s Ivy

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Questions About Devil’s Ivy

Asked by
Anonymous on
June 26, 2011

Q. Plant After Care

My Devil’s Ivy’s leaves are turning yellow and the leaves are dropping off. Please help.

Answered by
Nikki on
June 27, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

This is a sign of under watering or over watering. Make sure that the soil stays moist but with good drainage.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
December 1, 2011

Q. Indoor Plants

The leaves of my Scindapsus aureus (Devil’s Ivy) are all covered with yellowish spots. I wonder why. These 3 potted plants are growing in my office. Do I have to remove the whole plants and replant again?

Answered by
Nikki on
December 1, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

This is normally indicative of some type of environmental change, but yellow spots usually mean the plant is being deprived of nutrients. I would first reduce any watering, as over watering is one of the most common causes of leaf yellowing. You should also increase the fertilizer, should the plant be nutrient deficient. In addition, nutrient deficient plants may be a sign that it's in need of repotting. Are there any roots coming from the pot? How is the light where the plant is located? A change in light conditions can also trigger this response. Is it too drafty? You may need to move it. Finally, check the plant for pests. If necessary, you can treat it with neem oil, which should take care of any pest issues and as a bonus, it's also a great fungicide.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
September 16, 2012

Q. Devil’s Ivy

How do you fix devil’s ivy to a moss pole?

Answered by
Nikki on
September 17, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

Place the moss pole into the pot with the plant. Lightly tie the stems to the pole with string or pantyhose.

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Asked by
Emily1264 on
July 31, 2018

Q. What will happen if I cut a small amount of the tap root off my devils ivy that was tarting to get root rot?

I was trying to save my devils ivy which was stations to get root rot, and realised I cut some of the tap root which I wasn’t meant to do. It was really long and it is very well developed plant. It was only about 1/4 that I cut from it. So you think this will effect the plant much?

Answered by
BushDoctor on
July 31, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

The cut will not harm the plant. The fact that there is an infection in the soil will. That is a very large, and now open, vascular cluster. This means that the infection will spread much faster throughout the entire plant. It will be necessary to treat the infection fast in order to save this.

Use dolomitic lime, and wettable sulfur around the area. This will kill off infection, and stabilize the pH. This will offer the plant the best chance of survival.

Just make sure not to water the plant. Unless it is very dry for a long time, you will not need to water this. They are drought tolerant, and will prefer drier soil if you can help it.

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