Top Questions About Coreopsis Plants

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Questions About Coreopsis Plants

Asked by
Karen_lpn94 on
May 11, 2016
Central Illinois

Q. Tickseed coming up every year

I have little sprouts of my tickseed coming up. Two are about 4-5″ and are growing on last year’s plants. The rest are 1-2.” There are hundreds. Are they going to get big like the original plants? Should I thin them?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
May 12, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Certainly, they reseed themselves easily in the right setting and can even become invasive.

Here is a link with more information.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/bidens/caring-for-bidens-tickseed.htm

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Asked by
logcabin765 on
May 21, 2016
Louisiana, zone 8

Q. trimming coreopsis

If I cut back my coreopsis after it blooms, will it bloom again?

Answered by
kh0001 on
May 22, 2016
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Asked by
132nrb on
October 19, 2016
Hilton, NY 14468

Q. coreopsis

Do I cut the coreopsis back to the ground in the fall?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
October 20, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Do not cut them all the way back. Leave 6 to 8 inches of stem to help protect the crown in the winter.

Make your pruning cuts at a node on the stem.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
May 20, 2017

Q. golden sphere solanna coreopis

how do you dead head this plant

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
May 21, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

You can individually remove the spent flowers with small garden scissors or cut the entire plant down by 1/3 after flowering.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/coreopsis/growing-coreopsis-flowers.htm

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Asked by
Diane Prock on
June 25, 2017
73010

Q. Potted coreopsis

I bought 18 beautiful coreopsis plants (all in bloom) brought them home and planted them. I was told to keep them watered until they were established. It appears that the buds are turning black before they bloom. Too much water??? I deadhead every day. Please help.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
June 26, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Check the soil; it should be moist, never soggy or dry.
Make sure the soil and the container have a drainage hole and that the excess water is draining.
You may need to water daily, and even twice a day if the temperatures are above 85 degrees F.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/coreopsis/growing-coreopsis-flowers.htm

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Asked by
Ann Fishwick on
July 1, 2017
PR1 6BX

Q. Coreopsis grandiflora Presto

My Coriopsis is growing well in a pot from last year, just coming into flower with many buds. I want to transplant it into a larger tub as it looks over crowded. Would it harm it if I did it now or when is the best time to do it?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 5, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

It is best to wait until the plant is done flowering.

Only go up one size in pots to avoid overwatering and root rot.

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Asked by
Susie on
July 25, 2017
Peachland BC

Q. Coreopsis

Hello
I bought two perennial Coreopsis from a home hardware chain three weeks ago for my deck.
They were dry & flagging so I soaked them overnight & have been watering daily.
They now have lots of buds but they do not open fully & shrivel up before opening.
Can you advise please?
Thanks
Susan

Answered by
MichiganDot on
July 25, 2017
A.

Expect transplant shock, especially in mid-summer. The plants were probably left over from spring so were rootbound and not in good shape, as you said. Roots are now struggling to get established. Blooms take a lot out of a plant energy wise and are the first thing to suffer in transplants. I would actually trim back the entire plant to get rid of buds. Let it focus on roots, then green growth, then flowers. Coreopsis doesn't like a lot of water or fertilizer. Is this in a pot? Only water when the top 1" of soil is dry. Your goal is damp, not wet, soil. Provide shade for the rest of this week; hot sun will dry the leaves and blooms faster than the roots can replace water. Unlike annuals, perennials often don't show much top growth their first year.

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