Chocolate Vines

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  1. Akebia won't bloom
  2. I have two chocolate vines
  3. chocolate vine foliage has dark rust color on leaves
  4. spraying a chocolate vine
  5. Purchase of akebia quinata (chocolate vine)
  6. Chocolate Vine Not Producing Fruit
Asked by Jake040815 on June 17, 2012
Akebia Won’t Bloom

I have an Akebia trifoliata, chocolate vine. It’s three years old. It bloomed the first year, fewer blooms the second year. . . no blooms at all the third year. Plenty of foliage, but no flowers. It’s in full sun, on a south wall, growing on an arbor. It’s about 12′ long/tall. Any suggestions?

Thanks,
Long Island, New York

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

You may be lacking phosphorus. If there is a lack of phosphorus in the soil, plants will have little to no blooms. You can either use a phosphorus rich fertilizer or add some bone meal to the soil. This article may help as well:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/phosphorus-plant-growth.htm

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Asked by Linda Picard on August 4, 2014
I Have Two Chocolate Vines

I’ve had them for about 4 years. They grow on a trellis. My question is that only one of the plants will bear a few blossoms in the early spring but it never produces any fruit. They receive several hours of morning sun, then light shade starting about 1:30 or so. They have well drained soil. They grow on the”sunny” side of some redwoods. I water them once a week. The vines are leafy and grow well, but I want to know what I can do to make them flower better and produce fruit.

ANSWERS
theficuswrangler

The general diagnosis for non-flowering is that there is not enough sun, or too much nitrogen in the soil. So the first thing you could do is move your plants to a sunnier spot. This may sound like a lot of work, but remember gardeners often have to move plants around until they find the perfect spots for all of them -- and then they go and move them some more, just because. Another thing to do would be to add phosphorous in the form of bone meal. (I personally try to avoid using high-phosphorous fertilizer if I can because of the dangers to the environment of fertilizer run off.) You might also increase the organic content of the soil with mulch. Here's an article that might give you some more tips: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/vines/chocolate-vine/chocolate-vine-plants.htm

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Asked by saletagrace on June 3, 2015
Chocolate Vine Foliage Has Dark Rust Color on Leaves

My chocolate vine foliage has dark rust color on leaves. New leaves are green. Is this normal? I bought two chocolate vines two months ago from a nursery online. When I received them, one looked okay and the other one looked bad. I planted them together in a planter with potting soil and perlite. I made sure the drainage was good and it gets full sun and partial sun. I water it every other day or every day. Both of them started growing really well. But I noticed that the older leaves have dark rust color on the leaves. The new growth doesn’t. I don’t see any vining and it’s not growing rapidly as I thought. I check my flowers every day and now I’m worried that it stopped growing. Please help me. I don’t want this plant to die. Thank you for any advice and tips you can give me.

ANSWERS
Downtoearthdigs
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

You mention watering everyday, water only when the top inch or 2 of soil is dry. The pot appears large for the size of plant you have, so the roots are most likely waterlogged.

You may want to repot into a smaller container. I do think the plant will improve and then if need be you could go up to a larger size.

Here is a link to the proper growing conditions of Chocolate Vine.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/vines/chocolate-vine/chocolate-vine-plants.htm

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Asked by btnichols2 on June 27, 2016
Spraying a Chocolate Vine

I want to know if you can safely spray a chocolate vine without causing damage. I am spraying a mixture of eagle, which is a fungicide; tristar, a general insecticide; and floramite, a miticide.

ANSWERS
kh0001
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

If you are closely following the directions on the packaging of each, and if your Chocolate Vine is getting plenty of water, in partial shade and in well-draining soil, it should be fine. Be careful to not overuse it. Here is some additional information on growing Chocolate Vines: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/vines/chocolate-vine/chocolate-vine-plants.htm

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Downtoearthdigs
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

You will need to read the package application directions to determine if it is recommended for ornamental vines.
I would however recommend the use of Neem Oil. Neem Oil is organic and safe for people, pets and bees.
Follow application directions for this product also.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/pesticides/neem-oil-uses.htm

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/vines/chocolate-vine/chocolate-vine-plants.htm

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Asked by david.hemming4 on April 25, 2017
Purchase of Akebia Quinata (Chocolate Vine)

Can you please advise where we can purchase this vine in Australia. I am contactable via email on david.hemming4@bigpond.com

thank you
kim

ANSWERS
Downtoearthdigs
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

I would search local sellers and garden centers.
Try Ebay and Etsy, these are often great places to find more unusual varieties.

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Asked by Melissa S on August 17, 2017
Chocolate Vine Not Producing Fruit

My chocolate vine seems very healthy. It blooms nicely in the spring but doesn’t set fruit. Any suggestions?

ANSWERS
Downtoearthdigs
Certified GKH Gardening Expert
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