Top Questions About Chinese Wisteria Vines

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Questions About Chinese Wisteria Vines

Asked by
Anonymous on
November 24, 2010

Q. Wisteria Is Not Growing or Blooming

I planted a Chinese wisteria at least 6 years ago at my DE beach house. It’s not growing or blooming. It’s on the south side of the back yard a few feet from a plane tree and adjacent to the septic tank. At least twice a year, the back yard is covered with salt water. A neighbor’s wisteria has practically taken over an empty sandy lot (it’s covered the ground, as well as wound around several trees) . What does that wisteria have that mine does not?

Answered by
Heather on
November 27, 2010
Certified Expert
A.

It could be several things. The most common is that it may not have enough sunlight to grow properly. Since it is both stunted and not blooming, this sounds the most likely for yours. Is there anyway you can increase the light it gets, perhaps by thinning out the branches of the tree or by even transplanting it?
This article will help with that:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/vines/wisteria/transplant-wisteria-vines.htm

 

Your neighbor may also have is different variety of chinese wisteria from you that is just better suited to the conditions you have. You may want to try starting a plant from hers and see if that does not perform better for you. This article will help with that:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/vines/wisteria/propagating-wisteria-cuttings.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 13, 2011

Q. Sick Wisteria

We have a Chinese wisteria in our courtyard. We suspect it is at least 40 years old. It has bloomed beautifully for the past 19 years (since we moved here). We built a pergola to hold it. . . it’s magnificent. However, this year we had hard freeze in April (zapped the buds, but that happens every few years). We had no flowers, and have very few leaves and it’s mid June. We are heartbroken that it may be dying. We could prune it back, and hope it will revive itself. Do you have any hints about what might be wrong? Our local folks here in northern New Mexico don’t have a clue.

Answered by
Nikki on
June 14, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

I would cut it back to where the stems are still alive. This article will help you figure out where that is:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/how-to-tell-if-a-plant-is-dead-and-how-to-recover-an-almost-dead-plant.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 14, 2011

Q. Wisteria Flowering

I have a beautiful Chinese Wisteria that has been in growth three years. It has grown abundantly up my backwall, which is lovely and sunny. However, it has loads of leaves and tendrils but has not flowered. Is there anything I have to do and at a particular time to help it flower?

Answered by
Nikki on
July 15, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

This is actually a common complaint with this vine. Here is an article that you may find helpful: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/vines/wisteria/wisteria-blooming-problems.htm

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Asked by
max on
August 15, 2011

Q. Why isn’t my wisteria blooming?

This is the 2nd year I’ve had a wisteria. It is lush and leafy with lots of vines, but no blooms. Last year it had about 4 blooms but no sign of any this year. It is a white one and I think it is a Chinese, but not sure.

Answered by
Nikki on
August 15, 2011
Certified Expert
Answered by
greenlex on
August 15, 2011
A.

I know wisteria will grow vigorously in many light conditions. It will only bloom if it recieves FULL sun. 6+ hours per day. Dappled sun is often not enough.

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Asked by
wildfreefaller on
August 24, 2011

Q. Fungus on Chinese Wisteria

On the stem about 1 to 2 feet above the root, there is an ugly type of fungus growing on wisteria tree. What to do about it?

Answered by
Heather on
August 26, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

If it is a toadstool type growth, you can remove it and treat the area with a fungicide. But, truth be told, they are not harmful to the plant so you can also just leave it.

If it is a gall, which is more like a growth out of the plant than a separate organism, there are many things that can cause it. Most of the time, they are not harmful to the plant, but with a plant like wisteria, it could girdle it and kill it. Wisteria are susceptible to crown galls, so this article may be helpful if you feel it is a crown gall: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r280101311.html

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Asked by
rl4806 on
March 9, 2012

Q. wisteria buds look very dried out and no signs of opening

My Wisteria sinensis has lots of buds but they all look very dried out. Last year lots of leaves but no flowers, and was told I was watering too much. So last summer I watered during dry spells and gave it some tomorite. Made one seed pod, which also looked very dry and shrivelled (previous year it had been very full). Bought plant well established and flowering. Not sure if buds will plump up now or just dry out and fall off. Scratched stem and green underneath so still alive!

Answered by
Heather on
March 12, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

There are several things that can cause this issue.

It could be thrips. They attack the blossoms. This article will help if you think that it may be thrips:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/insects/controlling-thrips.htm

It could also have been a frost. Was there a frost in your area after the buds were on the plant? The flowers are much more vulnerable to frost than the rest of the plant and can die if exposed to it.

It could have been underwatering, but you would need to be in drought conditions if it were this.

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Asked by
passionategardener on
May 15, 2013

Q. My Chinese Wisteria Blooms Fall to the Ground

Chinese wisteria blooms fall to ground as soon as vine starts blooming. It’s about 10 years old. No insect problems. It seems like the slightest breeze shatters the bloom. What a mess! Twice a day sweeping right at the back door. Covering a wooden pergola.

Answered by
Anonymous on
May 20, 2013
A.

I would look carefully for thrips. They are hard to see and will attack the base of blossoms, causing them to fall off before they open.

Treat the plant with neem oil. That will take care of both pests and fungus and is safe for people and pets.

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