Top Questions About Canary Island Palm Trees

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Questions About Canary Island Palm Trees

Asked by
Anonymous on
July 23, 2013

Q. Canary Island Palm

I bought two Canary Island palms. They are fab and one is perfect, but the other took on too much water with all the rain last year, so I cut it back into the bark. Now I feel that was too much for it. Would it grow again or have I managed to kill it? There is a fine bark left with substantially big base and roots and I have cut all the damp away. I was hoping I could save it somehow.

Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
July 24, 2013
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Asked by
Jackie.kennwy7 on
July 22, 2017
Glasgow G59LA SCotland UK

Q. How to plant my canary oil palm tree and what soil and food to feed ?

I have my tree in a pot and wonder how long I can keep it in pot . Will tree get damaged ?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 24, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

It's best to get your palm planted into the ground.
This link will help you.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/canary-palm/canary-island-palm-trees.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 26, 2018

Q. holes in canary palm tree

We have a canary palm ( mature) that had a hole in it from possible red-fox tree squirrels. We put chicken wire around it last year and what ever animal made another hole below the hole again this year. what can we do to save this beautiful tree…..help! San Dimas, Ca.

Answered by
drtreelove on
June 26, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

From the photos this appears to be a very extensive amount of decay in the trunk of the palm. I would be concerned about risk of fracture and structural failure at that point. The full foliar crown of a mature Canary Island Palm like that can weigh several hundred pounds and represent extreme risk to any underlying property targets or risk for personal injury if it were to break and fall.

No matter what the original cause of infection, wounding, tree climber spikes, chain saw cutting too deep into the pseudobark, I believe that the squirrels are secondary opportunists and not the cause.

Because of the way that palms (monocots) grow, there is no way that I can think of to stop the advance of the decay. Covering the holes will only stop invasive activity but not advance of fungal decay.
This is serious for you safety. You are very near the UCCooperative Extension in Alhambra where Don Hodel is based. He is maybe the top palm expert in the world and has done a lot of research on palm diseases. You may get a free inspection and advise because of UCCE public advisory services.
http://ucanr.edu/sites/HodelPalmsTrees/?facultyid=1022

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