Campanula Plants

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  1. Do rabbits eat campanula?
  2. Campanula soil
  3. why are my tiny purple campanula flowers turning white
  4. cutting back campanula plants
  5. campanula
  6. campanula blossoms do not open
  7. Campanula care one flowers fade
Asked by stitus on July 11, 2012
Do Rabbits Eat Campanula?

I’m having a bad season due to an influx of rabbits who gobble up plant material almost as fast as I can plant it. Looking for a low border plant and was considering Birch Hybrid. Am I just feeding the herd?? And if not, do I have to deadhead these or can I just let them go?

Asked by kathicm303 on September 18, 2012
Campanula Soil

Does the perennial Campanula prefer acidic or alkaline soil? Thank You!

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

These plants normally like neutral to alkaline, or a pH range of 6 to 8.

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Asked by OLAROSE on August 26, 2014
Why Are My Tiny Purple Campanula Flowers Turning White

I recently bought a tiny purple flower campanula in a container and the flowers are turning light violet and white. I have it indoors where there is a lot of bright light.

ANSWERS
theficuswrangler

Campanula is an outdoor, full sun plant, so it can't thrive indoors. Using a campanula indoors is more like buying an especially long lasting flower bouquet. There's nothing wrong with that. You might like to try putting it outdoors, though - you can put it into a container with a few other plants if you don't have gardening space. Here's more information on these charmers: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/campanula/growing-campanula-bellflowers.htm
...and here's an article on plants that do flower well indoors: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/hpgen/good-indoor-plants-with-flowers-for-low-light.htm

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Asked by Vollmb1 on May 28, 2015
Cutting Back Campanula Plants

When Campanula (spreading) has stopped blooming, should I cut it back to the leaves so it blooms again? I am going to plant a Campanula (spreading) plant. It’s quit blooming and I wonder if it would be a good idea to cut it back to the leaves once I transplant it and if this will help it bloom again.

ANSWERS
shelley
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

The best way to promote blooms on a campanula bellflower is by deadheading. For more information on deadheading, please visit the following link:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/fgen/deadheading-flowers.htm

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Asked by Anonymous on June 7, 2015
Campanula

Once campanula has flowered, should I cut them low to promote new growth? I have now enjoyed them for two months, but they are ‘finished blooming.’ I had cut them last fall. They are in a container on terrace, will be very exposed to sun. Many thanks.

ANSWERS
Heather
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Campanula can be deadheaded to encourage additional blooming, as most will continue blooming throughout June. If you've already been doing this and it's simply done flowering, go ahead and cut the plant back to encourage its new growth, along with a second wave of fall flowering.

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Asked by cathrynh on July 13, 2015
Campanula Blossoms Do Not Open

I have several clusters of campanulas with lots of blossoms on each; however, the blossoms stay as puffy little balloons rather than open to reveal the inside. I have to go around and open them each individually. The blossoms will stay in the puffy state up through the end of each blossom’s cycle.

ANSWERS
Downtoearthdigs
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Most likely an environmental issue. It's just not happy with the temperatures.
They will likely open on their own eventually.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/campanula/growing-campanula-bellflowers.htm

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Asked by Anonymous on July 28, 2015
Campanula Care One Flowers Fade

What should I do with Campanulas now the flowers are fading? I have always found this site helpful, and have a query about Campanulas. I’m afraid I don’t know the species, but they are the type commonly sold in supermarkets (the purple flowering, low growing variety described by Tesco as “purple bellflower Campanula sarastro). I have been growing them for several months but now many of the flowers have died, and I am left with purely foliage. Should I trim this down, or let it die back naturally? I understand the plant is a perennial, but can I do anything to help it, or conversely should I avoid any particular course of action for fear of harming it? Thanks.

ANSWERS
Downtoearthdigs
Certified GKH Gardening Expert
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