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Top Questions About Blood Orange Trees

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Questions About Blood Orange Trees

  • Answered by
    Alisma on
    April 18, 2017
    Certified Expert
    A.

    It appears that you are in gardening zone 9b, and blood oranges are able to grow in zones 9-10, so the temperatures shouldn't be a problem. Make sure you have well-drained soil so that the tree won't be harmed by excessive rain (although if your Meyer lemon is growing well, you probably do have good drainage).

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  • Answered by
    Downtoearthdigs on
    June 11, 2017
    A.

    Did you grow this from seed?

    From each seed planted, three sprouts can emerge. Two will be fast growing sprouts which are vegetative in nature and will produce a tree exactly like the one from which the fruit was obtained. The center, weak sprout, if it emerges, is the genetic or different-than-its-parent growth which should be removed.

    Keep the seedlings in a bright, sunny spot with southern exposure and water them when the soil dries out on the surface, adding water until it trickles from the bottom of the pot. Fertilize the orange seedlings every two weeks with 1/2 teaspoon of 10-10-10 fertilizer diluted in 1 gallon of water. Stop fertilizing in autumn and winter. Orange trees respond well to being grown in containers, but they will perform best if planted outdoors within their preferred climate range.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/oranges/blood-orange-tree-care.htm

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    October 4, 2017
    Certified Expert
    A.

    This can happen for many reasons. You wouldn't think so, but Too much sun can cause this, as well as the wind, underwatering, and a number of pests. I would advise inspecting the plants further, and see if you can find anything off with the trees. Here is an article that will help you start looking for the problem: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/oranges/leaf-curl-in-orange-trees.htm

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    October 6, 2017
    Certified Expert
    A.

    This could be a large number of things. Can you include some pictures, so that I might be able to see what the damage looks like? I will include a link to common citrus problems, so that you can get a better idea of what's happening, and although the pest article is about limes, the pests are generally the same for all citrus.

    Here is the link to common lime pests: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/lime/problems-lime-trees.htm

    Here is a link to several articles on the orange tree: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/oranges/

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  • Answered by
    Downtoearthdigs on
    November 11, 2017
    A.

    Oranges typically take 12 months to ripen on the tree. Perhaps they just need more time.

    If the fruits have already been maturing 12 months, this could be a disease or perhaps a grafting issue. If there was a disease present, you would see other symptoms, like discoloration or mold on the surface of the fruits. If it is a grafted tree that produced good blood orange fruit previously, the rootstock could have taken over and started producing a different variety of fruit.

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  • Answered by
    Downtoearthdigs on
    December 6, 2017
    A.

    Unfortunately, oranges and other citrus fruits don't continue to ripen off the tree. Placing nets, tree collars, or other barriers on the trees that prevent the animals from climbing the trees can help. Some people have also had luck with animal repellents, but those tend to be a temporary measure.

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  • Answered by
    Downtoearthdigs on
    December 27, 2017
    A.

    Commercially, orange trees are almost always grown on grafted rootstocks because oranges are very susceptible to certain diseases, especially root rot caused by Phytophthora species. You can certainly grow a tree from a cutting as long as you are willing to take this risk. A tree grown from a cutting will produce the same type of fruit as the parent tree.

    Growing a tree from your blood orange's seeds is also possible, but the offspring might have different characteristics from the parent tree (for example the frut may be bitter), and it will also take about 3-5 years longer to produce fruit.

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