Top Questions About Black Walnut Trees

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Questions About Black Walnut Trees

Asked by
Pink Brandywine on
June 16, 2012

Q. Is it possible to deter a black walnut tree from producing walnuts?

We have a beautiful, huge black walnut tree in our backyard. In July – Aug thousands of walnuts fall. They turn black and gooey immediately. We spend every day picking them up and throwing them in trash bags. Getting too old to do this!

Answered by
Nikki on
June 18, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

There is no way to prevent the tree from dropping nuts. It would probably be just as easy to rake the area clean whenever needed.

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Asked by
jeannie1216 on
September 2, 2012

Q. how can i identify an invasive plant

I live in western PA. My yard is invaded with a tree like plant. My neighbor told me it was sumac but it never flowers. Ii even have it on growing out of my foundation. This plant grows up to 10 feet tall and seems to be spreading. Ii have a couple that look like small trees. Please help, as these plants are ruining my yard and are a nightmare.

Answered by
Heather on
September 16, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

It may be a Ailanthus (tree of heaven) or black walnut. These are rather invasive weed trees that look like sumac.

If you are finding that when you cut them back that they just regrow, try painting the fresh cuts with Roundup. The tree will suck the Roundup into the root system through the cut and this will kill the roots.

Once you have the more mature plants handled, the best way to handle them in the future is to become diligent about removing the seedlings as you find them.

The seedlings must be coming from a nearby plant (hopefully one in your yard). If possible, see if you can remove the source of the seeds or at least reduce how many seeds fall into your yard. If it is in a neighbor's yard, you can ask if they can at least prune any branches that hang over into your yard to help reduce how many seeds fall into your yard.

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Asked by
blackwalnut on
September 5, 2012

Q. evergreen to plant next to black walnut tree

Evergreen to plant next to black walnut tree.

Answered by
Nikki on
September 6, 2012
Certified Expert
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Asked by
Anonymous on
May 21, 2013

Q. To Prune or Not

I planted 10 black walnut trees with about 3/8 inches stem (trunk) thickness. Before I could fence them from deer, they chewed off and mashed the central stem bud of two trees. The question I have is should I prune the stem below the chewed/mashed central stem, or just leave it that way? And should I do the same if it were a oak or maple tree?

Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
May 21, 2013
A.

If they were mine, I'd prune the damage just above a node. This way a new branch will emerge with a clean wound above it. I would stake the young tree now, so you can bind the new branch to function as the new "leader". Use a stretchy, non-binding product such as an elastic waistband or pantyhose. As the tree grows, it will be more straight. I would do the same for either oak or maple.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
October 20, 2014

Q. Using black walnut chips to keep down weeds

I live next door to a black walnut tree farm. Over the years the previous owner of my land allowed the black walnut branches to be tossed into the weeds and treeline along the long driveway. Now I want to clean that up a bit and I’m considering chipping the stacks of branches and using them as mulch in the same area. Since the branches have already been there for some years, I figure that they won’t do any additional harm and maybe this mulch will keep some of the weeds from returning. Am I on the right track? Or should I burn the branches?

Answered by
Nikki on
October 20, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

As long as you do not plan on planting anything else where you place the black walnut mulch, then this is a great idea for weed control. It won't keep the weeds away 100%, but will reduce them some.

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Asked by
cniess on
March 12, 2015
Walnut Creek, CA

Q. Walnut trees sick with Canker disease

I have a black walnut tree that is easily 100 yrs old since this whole area used to be walnut orchards. The tree looks like, at one point, it was cut down but then 4 separate trunks grew back around the outer edges of the stump. It currently has what appears to be a large open wound with orange pus-like sap dripping out.

We have had 2 tree guys out who both say it is canker disease and the tree just needs trimmed but I am still concerned. We also have an English walnut that is about 40 feet away from the black walnut that is leaking the orange sap as well as dripping clear sap from several branches on the tree.

We have not trimmed recently. Both trees are currently leafless, as we are in late winter. I live in the bay area of Northern CA. What can/should I do? Please help! Thank you!

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
March 12, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

I would agree with the tree advice you have all ready received. You need to cut back the affected areas, to prevent spreading of the Canker.

Here is an excellent article that will help you.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/cankers-on-trees.htm

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Asked by
dallasb on
November 6, 2015

Q. What grass grows well near Black Walnut Trees?

My grass is very sparse at best under my Black Walnut tree. I wonder is the juglone responsible for that?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
November 9, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

You are correct in that there the Juglone will inhibit grass growth under and around the Black Walnut Tree.
There are many plants and ground covers that will do well.
Here is a few links with more information.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/nut-trees/black-walnut/black-walnut-compatible-plants.htm
http://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/yard-garden/landscaping/best-plants-for-tough-sites/docs/08464-under-black-walnut.pdf

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