Black Walnut Trees

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  1. Vegetables That Tolerate Black Walnut
  2. Black Walnut Trees
  3. Planting Under Black Walnut Tree
  4. Walnut Wilt
  5. Weeping Black Walnut
  6. Crepe Myrtle, Black Walnut
  7. Black Walnut Tree Bark Damage
Asked by Anonymous on November 21, 2010
Vegetables That Tolerate Black Walnut

My neighbor’s black walnut tree has made my vegetable gardening difficult. Are there any vegetables which can tolerate their toxin?

ANSWERS
roseman

Hello and thanks for this question. When I lived out on the farm we had several Black Walnut trees that presented me with such a challenge. I found that I could grow corn, squash, melons and carrots okay. Also lima beans, snap beans and some onions will tolerate the juglone in the soils according to some university testing. There can also be a problem with the juglone being abosorbed into the veggies that can cause allergic reactions, so be careful when eating the veggies that are produced in soils within range of the black walnut trees root systems.

Stan

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Asked by Anonymous on March 9, 2011
Black Walnut Trees

I just read the article on black walnut trees and how they affect the growth of some plants. We just got some grape, raspberry, blueberry, and blackberry plants. Will they grow around black walnut trees?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Unfortunately, no. These plants do not grow well around black walnuts.

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Asked by Anonymous on April 5, 2011
Planting Under Black Walnut Tree

What plants can I successfully plant under a Black Walnut tree that has an 8-inch diameter trunk? And, will I be more successful if I put more dirt around it to plant in (not at the base of the tree, of course)?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

This article has some suggestions for plants:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/nut-trees/black-walnut/black-walnut-compatible-plants.htm

Adding soil will only help in the short term. You are better off planting plants that can tolerate black walnuts.

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Asked by Anonymous on April 9, 2011
Walnut Wilt

I was wondering if there was a list of vegetable plants that walnut trees will affect besides tomato plants.

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Squashes, Melons, Beans, Carrots and Corn are known to be tolerant of black walnuts. Everything else is susceptible to the toxicity.

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Asked by rosie6 on May 1, 2011
Weeping Black Walnut

The wind broke a large limb of a black walnut tree. The tree is now oozing sap from that area and is dripping excessively down the trunk. Is there anything I can put on the wound? And is there anything I can do to clean the sap off the trunk?

ANSWERS
Heather
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

You may want to cut the wounded area to be flat rather than jagged, if possible. This will help keep disease out of it. You really can't stop the sap, and to be honest, it is the best things for the tree as it will keep the wound clean. Do not use anything to seal the wound as this can trap disease in the wound.

This article has some ideas on how to clean the sap off the trunk:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/how-to-remove-tree-sap.htm

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Asked by Anonymous on August 1, 2011
Crepe Myrtle, Black Walnut

Will proximity to a black walnut keep crepe myrtles from blooming? They are growing well but not blooming at all – wondering whether it could be the black walnut toxicity?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

If the crepe myrtles are growing well, then it is more likely shade than the black walnut that is keeping them from blooming. If it was the black walnut, it would be making the whole plant sick. This article should help with getting them to bloom: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/crepe-myrtle/crepe-myrtle-not-blooming.htm

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Asked by Anonymous on August 7, 2011
Black Walnut Tree Bark Damage

A bulldozer slightly damaged the bark on my tree. The wound is about 3 inches at its widest and about 2′ long. My question: has it been too long to strap the bark? It’s been approximately 3 weeks since the damage occured and the bark was still in place. The wound looks kinda dried out now. Any suggestions?

ANSWERS
Susan75023

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/repairing-tree-bark-damage.htm

This is a link to an article provided by the GardeningKnowHow website.

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