Top Questions About Black Mission Fig Trees

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Questions About Black Mission Fig Trees

Asked by
Ellen Tam on
October 23, 2014

Q. Can I grow black mission fig in container?

Greater Vancouver – Can I grow Black Mission fig in a container?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
October 25, 2014
A.

According to things I've read, almost any variety of fig does well in containers, although the larger types, such as black mission, will probably need more pruning. Here's a nice article about containerized fig: http://ucanr.edu/sites/MarinMG/Marin_Master_Gardener_Independent_Journal_Articles/?uid=159&ds=275
and here's a list of articles to cover almost any thing that comes up: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/figs/

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Asked by
Anonymous on
August 13, 2015

Q. Growing Figs

I have a very healthy 1 year old fig tree in a container on my patio. It has lovely healthy leaves and buds. When can I expect it to give me fruit and will it bloom first or what can I expect? I have not grown figs before. It is a Mission Fig. Many thanks for your input.

Answered by
SheilaSB on
August 14, 2015
A.

It would be helpful to know the state where you live and the climate zone. Also, is the fig the same variety as a hardy northern fig, or is it a fig suited only for warm climates? I once lived in an apartment in Houston, TX, that had a beautiful fig tree in the courtyard. Of course, Houston is in climate zone nine, which was mild for growing a fig tree. As for the tree producing flowers and fruit, it may need another fig tree for pollination. I am unable to answer your other questions, but perhaps you can find the information through "Google."

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Asked by
Anonymous on
August 29, 2015

Q. Mission fig leaf and bark problem

My black mission fig is at least 40 years old. On the western side, the bark is heavily wrinkled and the leaves are much smaller than the balance of the tree. Still bears figs on the western side, although smaller. Any suggestions on what it might be and what may possibly be done to alleviate the situation? Thank you for addressing this situation for me.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
August 29, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

It could be that it is just growing older. It is at an age where you will start to see it decline and figs can get wrinkled bark as they decline. But it could also be a pest. There are a few beetles that can cause wrinkled bark with their boring. Check the tree for evidence of boring around the area and it would not hurt to treat the tree with neem oil, which will be absorbed by the tree and will attack any pests that may be inside it.

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Asked by
kathrynsteidle on
August 6, 2016
85119 (Apache Junction AZ)

Q. Fig tree disease

I had two beautiful Black Mission Fig trees in my yard. First one, now the other developed a disease or fungus in which the leaves prematurely turned blackish-brown and died. When I cut down the first one, which did not re-leaf in the spring, the wood was dried and cracked throughout. Now the second, which appeared healthy earlier in the summer, is losing its leaves quickly and is oozing small areas of sap-like substance. I’ve resigned myself to losing the second tree as well, but I am wondering, what do I need to do to stop this from spreading to my citrus, and ornamental trees on my property? Can I treat the soil and plant some other kind of tree there?

Thank you so much.

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