Top Questions About Bee Balm Plants

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Questions About Bee Balm Plants

Asked by
jkomeara on
March 1, 2016
75093

Q. Ground cover

Is bee balm as invasive as mint?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
March 2, 2016
Certified Expert
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Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
March 2, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

No, Bee Balm is not as invasive as Mints.

That said, many gardeners refer to Bee Balm as Bee Bomb. The plantings will increase in size fairly quickly, so choose it's planting spot well.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/bee-balm/bee-balm-care.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
April 11, 2016

Q. bee balm

I didn’t cut my Bee Balm down in the winter. What should I do now in the spring? I planted Bee Balm in my backyard last year and did not cut them down. Now that spring is here, what should I do with them? The plants from last year are still tall, but dead. Will new growth happen on its own this spring? Should I cut the stems down now?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
April 12, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

I would prune down those old dead stems to keep your flower bed looking neat and tidy. New growth will happen on its own.

For more information on bee balm, please visit the following link:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/bee-balm/bee-balm-care.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
May 2, 2016

Q. Thinning out bee balm

I have a carpet of bee balm coming up. Obviously, self seeded. Should I be thinning these little shoots out?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
May 2, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Bee balm is susceptible to powdery mildew so thinning may not be a bad idea. The recommended distance between bee balm plants is 18-24 inches apart.

For more information on the care of bee balm, please visit the following link:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/bee-balm/bee-balm-care.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/bee-balm/propagating-bee-balm-plants.htm

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Asked by
Manddy75 on
July 16, 2016
Miami, Fl. 33173

Q. Bee balm

I live in Miami, Florida and I planted seeds and the plant looks healthy, but no flowers have emerged yet.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 17, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Grown from seed you most likely won't have flowers until next season.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/bee-balm/bee-balm-care.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
October 17, 2016

Q. Bee balm winter storage

I planted bee balm in small containers this spring. They flowered. I know I should cut them back in late fall, but should I bring them indoors for the winter? We get to below freezing in the winter.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
October 18, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Bee Balm is winter hardy in your growing zone and the plants can be cut back and allowed to go dormant.
Leave the pots in a sheltered location. A garage works well.
You can bring the pots back outdoors in the spring after danger of frost has passed.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/bee-balm/bee-balm-care.htm

Bee Balm is quite fast growing and your plants may outgrow the pots and need repotting or will do well planted in the ground.

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Asked by
747mdm on
June 8, 2017
13492

Q. Bee Balm

My bee balm has been dying off for about 3 years. I now have very little off. Any suggestions? I have inundated with slugs, do they eat the roots?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
June 11, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

This does sound unusual for Bee Balm, as it can become invasive.
Slugs would not dine on the roots, they would prefer leaves, though Bee Balm is not usually effected by Slugs.
Check the soil, is it well draining?
This article will refresh you on the growing conditions and may help pinpoint the issue.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/bee-balm/bee-balm-care.htm

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Asked by
ariesmoon66 on
July 15, 2017
Middletown, N.Y. 10940

Q. We live half the year in the Hudson Valley of N.Y and the other half of the year in Fl. This year we had to stay in Fl. because of

an operation I had. We’ve had landscaping people mulching our N.Y. garden in the spring and cutting back dead plants in the fal l. This spring our big patch of bee balm did not come up. I started it about17 years ago from a square ft. when I first planted it to a 10ft.x10ft. patch This year in the late spring in N.Y. we had a lot of rain. I don’t know if that had anything to do with the fact that my large patch of bee balm that had done beautifully for 17 years all of a sudden did not come up this spring. Fo you have any thoughts on this?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 17, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Heavy rains can cause the roots to rot out.
This is a common reason for die back or sudden die off of plants.
It can happen and sometimes there isn't a real reason.
A loss in the garden makes for new opportunities! Sometimes that little phrase helps me!

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