Top Questions About Aster Plants

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Questions About Aster Plants

Asked by
Cindydonahey on
April 9, 2018
43201

Q. Changing ph of soil for stokes asters

I have mildly alkali soil. Will using anthracite coal,dust or small coal chunks acidify. What about pine needles? The plants have survived over the,winter, but will probably die out, as situation now stands.

Answered by
BushDoctor on
April 9, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

This can help some, but I would recommend using iron sulfate to safely acidify the soil. A soil test will be necessary to know exactly how much you need to lower the pH.

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Asked by
Marta Cummings on
May 19, 2018
46567

Q. How to care for wild asters?

I have a purple wild aster bush that is getting quite leggy by the time it blooms in August. Blooms nicely but rather stalky on the bottom. Am I suppose to trim it back in the spring like mums? When is the best time? I\’m afraid it\’s too late now. I live in northern Indiana. My plant is about 8 inches tall already.

Answered by
MichiganDot on
May 19, 2018
A.

Yes, treat your aster like a mum by pinching it back on Memorial Day and July 4th. It will be shorter, bushier and give a lovely show come fall. Asters do quite nicely in poor soil so do not fertilize it as this will result in leggy growth and fewer flowers.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 1, 2018

Q. Asters

I noticed that when my Aster blooms fall off, there appears to be seeds like Marigolds. Are these seeds, and can I plant them?

Thank you in advance!

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
June 2, 2018
A.

To keep your asters blooming nicely you will want to remove these seed heads anyway so why not try to create new plants from the seed. This article should help

http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/asters/growing-asters.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
September 11, 2018

Q. asters

I have a large aster plant that isn’t getting enough sunlight and I will be moving it.
Can it be split in two or three sections?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
September 12, 2018
A.

Yes, you may split these if you would like. Here is an article that will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/asters/growing-asters.htm

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Asked by
argyle7 on
September 16, 2018
Barrie, Ontario Zone 4

Q. My asters are a deep royal blue..what is their name..thanks

I bought as a large thickly blossomed potted plant in late September 3 years ago..placed them in the ground in October..watered in well, covered with cedar mulch..they returned last year but did not bloom..so this year I cut them back once they became a foot tall..now they are covered in the same royal blue flowers with yellow centres..I love them and don’t want to lose them..how do I make them bushier? Thanks so much for your help..I don’t have a camera but they are just lovely

Answered by
MichiganDot on
September 16, 2018
A.

I'm not sure why your asters didn't bloom last year. Are they in full sun? There are hybrid asters that make knowing exactly which one you have very difficult. It sounds like Aster novae-angliae, aka Symphyotrichum New England aster. It may also be Aster novi-belgii "Royal Blue", a New York or Michaelmas aster. Like mums, asters need to be trimmed once or twice before July 4th. This helps them bush out instead of becoming rangy. Since asters are prone to mildew, remove some stems to the ground to increase air circulation. Fertilizer isn't necessary and may encourage tall, floppy growth. Put 2 inches of compost around the base of the plant annually instead of fertilizer. Consider saving some seed from this year's blooms. Asters are easy to grow from seed and seed can be sown in late fall where you want it to grow. If your aster is a hybrid, plants from seed will not look exactly like the parent plant. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/asters/aster-seed-planting.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
September 12, 2019
Answered by
GKH_Susan on
September 13, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, especially native asters. Also, lantana, pentas, chrysanthemum, frostweed (native), zinnia, butterfly bush, purple coneflower, helenium, goldenrod, milkweed.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/beneficial/plants-for-migrating-butterflies.htm

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Asked by
anssignup on
September 17, 2019
21075

Q. Asters are all yellow and look dead

Hi,

We recently replanted store bought asters into our garden bed and immediately they seem to have died. All the flowers are dead and the foliage is yellow and way too dry. What do you think the problem is, and how can we revive them, if at all?

Answered by
BushDoctor on
September 18, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

Now will not be a good time to plant these. It is still far too warm.

These should be planted in Spring in your area, as the warmer weather will prevent them from taking to the transplant. Compounding the issue will be overwatering in attempt to compensate for the dry and heat. This leads to infections.

Your best bet will be to treat with a fungicide, and hope for the best. They may or may not make it until next year. Should they not come up by mid spring next year, you will know that you should replant then. Waiting until this time of year will usually end up like this.

This article will help you to plant and care for these flowers: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/asters/growing-asters.htm

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