Top Questions About Arrowhead Plants

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Questions About Arrowhead Plants

Asked by
Kathie on
April 5, 2012

Q. How do I prune my Arrowhead Plant?

I have an Arrowhead Plant but it only has one vine. It has grown to about 3 feet tall. I now read that I should prune it to make it more bushy. Did I wait too long? How should I prune it?

Answered by
Nikki on
April 5, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

Just snip the top of your plant, taking about 6-12 inches. This will keep the vine from continuing to grow and provide bushier growth. To maintain this bushy appearance, simply cut the climbing stems off as they develop. You can also use the cuttings to make new plants. They root easily in water.

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Asked by
dlohrbach on
April 20, 2012

Q. arrowhead plant

We have an arrowhead plant at work. It seemed to be doing ok until Christmas when the plant was moved. Since then, the plant had some other plants put in the pot with it (the same just a different color). The original plant seemed to have a growth spurt after that, but in March the plants have all started turning brown (like it is burned) and the plants that were added to the original have died altogether. This plant container sits on the floor by a desk. There is a computer box under the desk.   Could this have anything to do with the plant dying? We have moved it nearer the window but I am afraid that it will get too dry as the window faces west and the afternoon is quite hot coming thru them. Plant is watered once a week–not overwatered.

Any help would be great—we would like to save our plant.

Answered by
Heather on
April 22, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

It does sound like the plant has had too little water. The growth spurt was its way of trying to reach out to find more sun. I would place it in the window. Make sure that you are checking the top of the soil regularly and watering when it is dry to the touch. As long as the plant stays watered, it should be fine but it needs more light or it will die.

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Asked by
SHVBMDBJ on
September 15, 2012

Q. care of syngonium podophyllum

Syngoniium podophyllum: What does it mean if the leaves turn yellow – over or under watering? Not enough light?

Answered by
Nikki on
September 15, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

Yellow leaves can be caused by a number of things. Typically in houseplants, it is either underwatering or overwatering. You can feel the soil to see if it is too moist. If so, back off on watering. Water when the top of the soil feels dry, but to do let the soil dry out all the way. This article will have some other causes for yellow leaves: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/plant-leaves-turn-yellow.htm

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Asked by
ishrat on
June 21, 2013

Q. My Syngonium Doesn’t Look Good After Repotting

My Syngonium was growing well. But the pot wasn’t nice. That’s why I have divided my plant into two parts and repotted them in two different pots. Those pots have good drainage systems. But today I found my plants are dizzy. At the repotting time, I cut some roots. Is this the main reason? I am feeling hopeless. Please help me. I don’t wanna lose them.

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
July 18, 2013
A.

If the roots even moderately filled the pot, they were probably growing around the pot, and when you divided the plant, you may well have cut major root systems, so that now the plant halves are functioning with only a small portion of their original roots. I don't know if you untangled the roots before cutting the plant, but if you didn't, that might have saved some of the stress. However, not to worry. Bonsai enthusiasts often cut back the roots of a plant by 1/2 to 2/3. Roots are very vigorous, and they will grow again. Just make sure the soil stays neither too wet nor too dry, and you provide plenty of bright indirect light.

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Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
June 21, 2013
A.

Your plants are probably experiencing transplanting shock or stress. Severing of roots during dividing is inevitable, but the plant isn't happy. The roots will grow, and your plants will perk up with a little time.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
January 18, 2014

Q. Arrowhead Plants and Drafts

I have 2 healthy Syngoniums. I live outside Boston; they go outside in the summer. Now in January, I’d like to put the larger one near my front door, also near a NE window. It’s a drafty spot, and the indoor temp goes down to 60 F. at night. Will it be okay, or is it a bad idea? Thanks!

Answered by
Nikki on
January 18, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

As long as the temps do not drop much below 60 degrees, your plant should be fine. Don't forget to mist the plant or add a water-filled tray of pebbles beneath it to help with humidity. This article should help as well: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/arrowhead-plant/arrowhead-plant-care-arrowhead-plant-or-syngonium-podophyllum.htm

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Asked by
princessnikki36_twitter on
January 25, 2014

Q. How to bring my 16 year old arrowhead plant back to health

How do I bring my 16 year old arrowhead plant back to health? I received my arrowhead vine 16 years ago when my son was born. We recently moved into a new home with low light. No matter where I move it, I can’t get it to bounce back. It always seems dry, yet when I water it (I don’t over water), it doesn’t help either. I don’t want to lose this plant… What do I do?

Answered by
Heather on
January 27, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

It may be remaining dry, even after you water it. I would guess that in your move, things got a little understandably hectic and the plant maybe dried out completely. This can make the soil turn hydrophobic, meaning it will repel water rather than soak it in. You need to force it to start absorbing water again. Take the container and put it in a tub or sink. Fill the water up until it covers the container and allow it to soak for 20-30 minutes. This will force the soil to rehydrate completely and you can resume normal watering after that.

Moving can be stressful on a plant regardless. Try treating the plant with a pesticide and a fungicide. This will help address any unseen pests or slow acting diseases that may have started to affect the plant while it was stressed.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
March 15, 2014

Q. Arrowhead Plant

My plant seems to have a tough time staying healthy looking. I try not to water too much and allow it to dry out between waterings. I just read that I should mist it frequently. What is occurring is a very wilted look and the leaves keep turning yellow and I pluck them off. Not much of a plant left. Down to about a dozen leaves. I read where it likes bright “filtered” light. It used to get less light than it does now and neither seems to be helping on that front. Concerned I will lose it!

Answered by
Nikki on
March 15, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

You may be allowing it to dry out too much or, the other possibility, it is root bound. Water when the top of the soil is dry and check it to see if it root bound. This article will help with that: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/root-bound-symptoms.htm

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