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Questions About Alder Tree

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  • Answered by
    Downtoearthdigs on
    November 2, 2017
    A.

    The sap of some trees is darker and can appear oily. Common reasons for trees to leak sap are physical injury, bacterial or fungal diseases, environmental stress, or insect damage. If you don't see any physical injuries on the trees, check for symptoms of bacterial disease:
    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/wetwood-bleeding-trees.htm

    One form of bacterial disease affecting alders in New Zealand is below:
    http://www.nzffa.org.nz/farm-forestry-model/the-essentials/forest-health-pests-and-diseases/diseases/Pseudomonas-syringae

    If the problem persists, you may want to consult an arborist or university extension service professional to help with diagnosis and treatment.

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  • Answered by
    GKH_Susan on
    April 1, 2020
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Thank you for your observation. I will forward your comment to the editor for review.

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    June 12, 2020
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Though pruning can promote branching, it can also weaken the structure over time. Have care when pruning, and only leave branches that are angled upwards, and not horizontal.

    Here is an article for more information on the tree:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/alder/black-alder-tree-info.htm

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  • Answered by
    GKH_Susan on
    January 7, 2021
    Certified Expert
    A.

    My research showed 40 to 50 cm between rows. Also, I read that Italian alder roots are invasive and should be planted 30 meters from structures.

    Here's more info that may be helpful:
    https://hortnews.extension.iastate.edu/2002/3-22-2002/hedges.html

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    August 24, 2021
    Certified Expert
    A.

    I'm afraid that it would be a very bad idea. You could try growing it in container, though:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/growing-trees-in-containers.htm

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    February 21, 2022
    Certified Expert
    A.

    This can be done, but it will need to be done with very small buds grafted on at the correct time. Here are some articles that will help you to get started:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/grafting-trees-what-is-tree-grafting.htm

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/propagation/grafting/what-is-budding-propagation.htm

    Generally, you can use small branches, but the larger the branch you use the more likely that it will fail. This is why buds are preferred.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/propagation/grafting/what-is-a-scion.htm

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/propagation/grafting

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  • Answered by
    Mike-Alder on
    February 25, 2022
    A.

    Hi,

    That does not really help, It will not be me doing the work, I expect the Electricity Supply company to bear the cost and supply an expert at doing this. I want to know how hard to push back to them. Another possibility is to push them to provide a replacement tree of about 8 metres tall!
    It I insist upon splicing, how many 1-2 inch splices would it take to get 3 successful splices?

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