Top Questions About Acuba

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Questions About Acuba

Asked by
lenrbb on
July 10, 2017

Q. Aucuba japonica leaf wilt

Shrub is about 2-3 feet size, in current location 3 years and previously healthy. Since spring this shrub shows leaf curling on several branches. Stands in partial shade. No other leaf distortion or discoloration.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 12, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Leaf curl does generally indicate pests, disease or even exposure to herbicides.
Inspect the leaves and bark for any indications of issues. Some pests can be difficult to see.
These links have more information.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/aucuba/aucuba-plant-care.htm
http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/plants/landscape/shrubs/hgic1057.html

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Asked by
Anonymous on
March 5, 2018

Q. Acuba salt tolerance

Can Acuba be planted near saltwater pool?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
March 6, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, Aucuba is listed as moderately salt tolerant.
Here is a great link that will help you with plant selections.

https://www.ces.ncsu.edu/files/library/71/Salt%20Tolerant%20Plants.pdf

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/aucuba/aucuba-plant-care.htm

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Asked by
Donna Tait on
July 7, 2018

Q. Can Aucuba Shrubs be salvaged after too much sun?

We hired a landscaper to help us plan and plant a perimeter garden for our large yard. For the first phase , we only wanted to plant the sunny side to help hide a neighbor\’s fence. Unfortunately, you trust that a professional who claims to have taken horticulture classes at the college level and charges accordingly, would know the difference between plantings requiring sun and those requiring shade. The Aucubas he planted along the sunny side of the fence had leaves that turned black as a result of needing a shaded location. I managed to salvage some and so far they seem to be doing well in their new shady spot. However, I have about six that are now bare after removing the black leaves. I have cut away the black stems and now have what looks like green, healthy stems with no leaves. They are also in the shade and being cared for as the others. Should I continue or are they
unfortunately ready for the garbage?

Answered by
drtreelove on
July 7, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

As long as there are green healthy appearing stems there is hope that they will re-foliate. Keep up with appropriate care for a month, keep them watered but don't fertilize until they show new full size leaves. And maybe talk to them about your hopes for a long term relationship.

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