Peperomia Plants
Q.

Peperomia won’t get better

Zone 78230 | eashleyflo added on July 13, 2019 | Answered

I bought a pretty large peperomia at a local nursery in my city. After a week I pruned the plant (carefully I thought) because it was a bit overcrowded and didn’t leave me a lot of room to water the base of the plant. After pruning it all was well for about a week, but then I repotted it. I didn’t want to repot it at first but the soil of the plant was rock hard and I tried breaking up the soil a little with a pen but it wouldn’t break apart! I then decided okay I need to repot it and give it fresh soil. I repotted it in a ceramic planter and after it was pretty limpy. I thought it was because I had just repotted it so I gave it a good soak (before repotting it I took the plant out and realized the soil was completely bone dry) so I thought I would wait it out. It stood up a bit more after a few days (pictured) but after it started to get worse. It lost many old leaves and the new leaves that are growing in are soft and limp. I tried to keep it out of the sun after repotting for the first week and have since tried to give it indirect sunlight but this has not helped. I’m not sure what I did! I don’t know if maybe it is very shocked after being pruned and repotted, or if maybe I pulled out the roots when I repotted it at first. It is also very weird because the stems seem okay at the base but the stems hanging from the nodes are the limpy stringy ones (pictures) and so I’m not sure how to help my little guy!

A.
A.Answers to this queston: Add Answer
BushDoctor
Certified GKH Gardening Expert
Answered on July 14, 2019

That is a LOT of stress to put on a plant at one time!!!

It sounds like there are a lot of factors compounding on top of one another, and doing anything else will likely kill the plant.

This treatment should have been spaced out over several months as to not shock the plant.

From here, you will need a lot of patience and perfect care of the plant, including letting the soil dry out between watering.

Because they are compact, naturally, they will grow very happily like this. Pruning will not be necessary, and will often be a chance to introduce an infection.

This article will give you more information on the care of these plants: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/peperomia/growing-peperomia-houseplants.htm

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