Open2

Inheriting Garden Beds


jcav added on April 4, 2017 | Answered

hi-we inherited 5 beautiful garden beds that I believe have sat empty for years. I also do not know if they were growing vegetables or flowers in them. All the beds need at least 8" of new compost/soil, but my question is.....should I be concerned what the quality is of the existing beds, or just focus on my new compost? I don't want to be growing food for my family that's sitting on top of years of miracle grow or other contaminates. I have a company that will test the soil, but I believe they only will tell me about pH, nitrogen, etc....what do u suggest? I'd like to avoid removing all their existing soil, but dont want to make foolish mistake. thanks!


Share this Question:
Log in or sign up to help answer this question.
Check here if you would like to receive notifications every time this question is answered.
You are subscribed to receive notifications whenever this question is answered.
ANSWERS
Downtoearthdigs
Certified GKH Gardening Expert
Answered on April 6, 2017

First, a soil test is an excellent way to start!
Your County Extension Office will do a soil test for a few dollars.
This is the starting point and save time and money in prepping your garden beds for the growing season.

Here is a link to locate your nearest office.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/extension-search/

Here are some links on soil amendments and the best soils for vegetable beds.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/vgen/raised-vegetable-gardens.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/best-soil-raised-garden-beds.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/organic/the-importance-of-soil-for-an-organic-garden.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/improving-garden-soil.htm

Was this answer useful?
00
Looking for more?
Here are more questions about Open2

You must be logged into your account to answer a question.

If you don't have an account sign up for an account now.