Roses

An Antique Rose.


Anonymous added on April 25, 2018 | Answered

I transplanted this two seasons ago from Penna to Michigan. It has never bloomed and now we are Moving from Michigan to TN. I inherited this rose and it means a lot to me. It is larger now and very spindely. so should I trim it back and put it into a large container? I have no idea how to protect this rose. It has already been through a shock. We will be taking it down around the 25th of May and it is much warmer there...Any advise would be welcomed. Thank you, Ashley Ritenour


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ANSWERS
roseman
Answered on April 26, 2018

Hello Ashley. First thing is to be very sure that the rose you cherish is truly still the same rosebush. You see many roses are grafted roses, meaning that the top and desired part of the rosebush is one bush. The root stock it was grafted onto is usually a very hardy rosebush that can deal with many climatic and soils issues. Once the rosebush gets older and sometimes after just a winter or two, the upper part dies. In some cases the root stock rose takes over and sends up its own shoots. These root stock roses may not produce blooms for a couple years and then when they do, the blooms are nothing like what the desired rose had been. Your comment about the rose being larger and very spindly has me concerned as those can describe a root stock take over situation. This being said, if you are sure it is indeed the same rose, take the following steps. Water the rosebush well with some water that has a product called Super Thrive in the water. The following day prune the rose back to a manageable size. Water it with the super thrive mixed water again the day before digging her out. Place the rosebush into as large a pot as you can find and still manage it. Use the super thrive mixed water to keep the soils moist until the bush is transplanted. At time of transplant, sprinkle 1/3 cup of Kelp meal into the planting hole once the hole is about half full of planting soils. Work the kelp meal lightly into the planting hole soils. Fill up the rest of the way with a good bagged garden or potting soil. Such as the Eko Brand type with the yellow front panel label on the bag. Water the rosebush in well with some water that has both the super thrive and a root stimulator in the same water. Water the rosebush with the super thrive and root stimulator water mix the next 4 to 5 times she needs watering. The super thrive helps the rose deal with all forms of shock and the root stimulator gets the root system off to a good start at getting re-established in her new soils home.

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