Aloe Vera Plants

Aloe Vera Plant


sjm1108 added on March 14, 2013 | Answered

I have 4 questions on Aloe vera plants. Just saw that it is a Aloe dichotoma or quiver plant. It's growing very large and top heavy, I have bamboo sticks bracing it up helping out a bit.

My first questions is: How much can I prune off the top? I have about 6 large leaves and 4 small leaves about 3 inches long.

2. Can I prune to the small leaves?

3. Is it ok if I prune after it has been watered for a couple of days? I usually prune it when it is dried out, after pruning I water.

4. Is there anything I can do with the trunk without killing my plant? The trunk is about 1 foot long and 1 inch thick. I'm afraid to bring to kitchen to water now?

Thanks
Stephen


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ANSWERS
sjm1108
Answered on April 16, 2013

Thanks I'll Start bringing Aloe Plant out when weather gets nicer.
Stephen
PS: Ann the sunflowers I'm growing is the Mamoth, cant find the video. it was on you tube though.

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AnnsGreeneHaus
Answered on April 3, 2013

OK, now I'm lost. What sunfloiwers are you talking about?
Back to the aloe. After you cut the top off, leave the top laying in a box, or anything realy, for about 2 weeks. Peel enough leaves off the cut end of the top to expose 3-4 inches of stem. Fill the new container with soil, and push the stem into the soil to the leaf. Water the unrooted top so the soil will be moist and roots should appear in a couple weeks.
How much light is the aloe in? A lot of the aloe family love full sun. Some don't, like aloe vera. If your plant is getting enough light/sun, it should be sturdy enough to hold itself upright with no help. This plant grows into a tall tree in nature, so it has to have a strong stem. If your plant can't hold its head up, try to get it into a brighter location. Since they grow in full sun in their native habitat, I think it will take all it can get. Just remember to acclimate it before letting it sit in all day sun. (Kinda like getting a tan, a little more at a time so you don't burn.)
Hope this helps. ag

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sjm1108
Answered on April 3, 2013

regarding the drying out, you mean don't water the plant until the head is calloused, then move plant to new soil. I really don't like the sticks in the plant.

Reading up on sunflowers to keep them from tipping over, at 1 foot you put dirt 3 to 5 inches up the stem so the sunflower can make it root system go from there. Was thinking that should work with an aloe also since both root like crazy. what do you think?
thanks for all the advice.
Stephen

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AnnsGreeneHaus
Answered on March 30, 2013

Stephen, If your plant behaves like all the different aloes I've w orked with, it should "pup-up" after the trunk has been cut. It may take up to 4-5 months, don't be in a hurry. The new pups will come from under soil level or off the stem above the soil. Let the severed top callous for a couple weeks before putting it into potting soil. I've found that almost all succulents root more quickly when they have dried out. (I've even left different succulents out to dry for 6-8 months before sticking, and they were rooted in no time. I really don't reccomend this, it happened by accident.)
If you don't feel comfortable cutting the trunk, theficuswaragler offered good advice. Just don't put the plant in a huge pot...I'd use one 4-6 inches larger than what it's in now.

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sjm1108
Answered on March 28, 2013

Thanks for Advice,
Let me see if understand it correctly regarding the cutting of the trunk.
If I cut the trunk new leaves will form under the cutting or other little aloe plants (PUPS) will grow from the dirt.

This plant has been with me for over 15 years. That's why I am asking all these questions. don't want to kill it. I know what you mean Ann. I had a corn plant when I bought it it was 2 feet tall, it grew to ten feet. I let my brother stay in my place for a couple of months thought he take care of plants he killed everything. I guess the below zero temp and my brother are similar.
Stephen

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theficuswrangler
Answered on March 20, 2013

I agree with Ann that (theoretically) you should be able to prune (cut) the trunk, and the plant will send up a new shoot(s), and also the part with the leaves should be able to be rooted. However, I don't have actual experience with this plant. If you really like the trunk appearance, why don't you repot the whole thing into a larger container, then sink in a heavy stake, something like a thick dowel or 1" x 1" piece, something strong enough to hold the aloe up.

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AnnsGreeneHaus
Answered on March 16, 2013

Stephen, although I'm familiar with aloe's, I've not "met" the type you have. Honestly, I've been perplexeed about the phrase, "pruning an aloe"...you haven't been the first. I think we are on the same page now.
The pictures I've seen of the Quiver Tree are majestic.
When you said that you use the gel, I realize that it is very much like A. vera.
If you cut the trunk, the plant should pup from the base. When A. vera gets too "long in the pot", I usually cut the trunk and let it root in a new container. Just strip a few of the bottom leaves off to expose the trunk and stick it in potting soil. I still think that your plant should be in enough light to make it strong enough to support it's own weight.
I had an A. ferox that was 7 feet tall, 6" diameter, sitting on the floor of a greenhouse. The roots escaped the pot and grew into the ground. It withstood major abuse for years until a failed heater and below zero temps killed it. It was a splendid plant.

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sjm1108
Answered on March 16, 2013

I have always been prunning this plant for the past 5 years, about 3 to 5 large leaves off the bottom to keep the top leaves and the whole plant stronger also using the gel.

you said you dont think pruning my plant wouldnt be such a good idea by that do you mean cutting the trunk or prunning the leaves?
Thank you
Stephen

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AnnsGreeneHaus
Answered on March 15, 2013

Aloe dichotoma is a tree form aloe, often reaching 25-30' in heigth. This plant should be grown in extremely high light. It is native to the Northern Cape region, and Namibia of South Africa where it grows in intense sun. Personally, I don't think pruning your plant would be a good idea...

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