Japanese Cherry Trees

A Tree That Is Slowly Dyeing and Needs Replacement


Anonymous added on April 9, 2018 | Answered

Hi again, You have helped me before so I am hoping you can again. We have a Japanese Cherry tree in our front yard and it was here when we moved here in 1998. It wasn\\\'t really healthy then but has survived and has beautiful blooms every spring. I had to do a little more pruning of dead limbs this year and feel that it may only last a very few short more years. What I would like to know is, where can I find another Japanese Cherry to replace it. It only stands about 8-9 ft. tall and has never been really tall but is a beautiful pink \\\' ball \\\' every spring. I really appreciate your help. Thanks again. Carolyn Cloverdale, CA


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ANSWERS
BushDoctor
Certified GKH Gardening Expert
Answered on April 10, 2018

That is something that we don't normally do. I can't really recommend a particular place to purchase, but I do recommend checking local nurseries, or online nurseries, as they will usually ship just about anywhere. If you can post a photo of the tree, maybe I can see if it can be saved or if it is best replaced.

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drtreelove
Answered on April 10, 2018

In northern California you usually have a long dry summer and fall. To save your existing tree, or establish a new tree if necessary, be sure to keep up with water management during that dry season. Water deficit/drought stress is the primary cause of branch dieback. Deep water at least twice a month, throughout the area under the entire foliar canopy, "dripline" and a little beyond. Apply a two to three inch layer of organic mulch, compost or wood chips from a tree service, to the soil surface out past the dripline. This helps retain soil moisture, keeps competing weed growth down, and as it decomposes adds to soil organic matter and feeds beneficial soil microorganisms that feed the tree.

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